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  • Re: BeoVox 2600 Refurbishment

    But the difference Rich mentioned wasn't bad versus good. It seems like a speaker recap is no guarantee to improve the sound. On my S55 recap I didn't hear any improvement. I didn't hear any sound degredation with the new caps either. So the comfort is knowing there are new electrolytic caps in the crossover and I don't have to worry about that being an issue. On the recent MS150 project I didn't bother trying the speakers with the crossovers as I received them because I felt
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Mon, Apr 30 2012
  • Re: Workbench tools

    Here is a picture of my variac, AC ammeter, AC voltmeter and (switch in/out) dim bulb tester. The light bulb will take the current when you apply power to a device that has a short. It (the bulb) acts as a current limiting device. When it is in the circuit and there is no short, the bulb will briefly glow, then go dim ... indicating there isn't a short. If the bulb glows bright and remains in that state, then there is a short. It is a quick, easy test to indicate if there is a problem with a
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Mon, Apr 30 2012
  • Re: BeoVox 2600 Refurbishment

    For someone so young you have a great collection of vinyl records (from rock's good years). On this crossover recap - are you going to do just one speaker first and compare the sound to the other speaker? If you do set your music source to mono and see if you can hear a difference. I tried that on my Beovox S55's but I replaced the electrolytics with new electrolytics and couldn't really tell a difference. I thought I did at first but as I listened to them more I couldn't tell them
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Sun, Apr 29 2012
  • Re: Workbench tools

    Of course it all depends on how deep you are going to dive in. If you are mainly refurbishing - doing recapping and refoaming then just a good soldering iron, de-soldering gun and maybe a capacitance (ESR) meter will do. I don't think I could live without my Hakko desoldering gun now that I have used it about a year. A good DVM is something everyone should have even if you are not fixing vintage audio equipment. If you think you will be taking on tasks like trouble-shooting circuit problems then
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Sat, Apr 28 2012
  • Re: A Beovox MS150 Project

    Here are pictures of my reassembled and fully functional MS150 speakers. I don't have a set place for them in my house except for my workshop area and it is too messy to take a picture right now. So I set the speakers up outside for these speakers. I decided to use the metal stands seen in the photograph for these speakers instead of the M100 stands I have because it is easier to lift these speakers and move them without stands attached. These stands work really well. The subwoofer port on the
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Sun, Apr 22 2012
  • Re: A Beovox MS150 Project

    That is where I got my parts too. In case you haven't opened up your MS150 cabinets before... When you open the speaker cabinets be aware that the two wires from the cabinet speaker terminal to the crossover board does not provide much slack. So after you have removed the screws for the cabinet front, carefully turn the front on its side keeping the middle part of the front across the middle of the cabinet (wood part). While turned on its side that way you should have plenty of slack to remove
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Sun, Apr 22 2012
  • Re: A Beovox MS150 Project

    Wow! These speakers sound great. They are as good as advertised. Definately ones that I will keep. I didn't have much trouble re-assembling them...just took my time and verified with pictures that I had all of the wires hooked up correctly. It's too late and I'm too tired to take any pictures tonight but I will tomorrow. I listened to a variety of music from classical to rock n' roll (Tchaikovsky's Capriccio Italien to The Rolling Stone's Can't You Hear Me Knocking). The
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Sun, Apr 22 2012
  • Re: A Beovox MS150 Project

    I will have to keep the scratched, circular tweeter/midrange trim piece with the MS150 as it turns out. I tried the one from the MC120.2 and there are differences. They are the same size and the trim piece fits into the front speaker frame perfectly. However, there is a difference in the look on the front and on the molding where the drivers mount. Here is a side by side comparison picture. So much for that idea but I did remove the 8 inch woofer (temporarily) from the MC120.2 so I can assemble my
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Sat, Apr 21 2012
  • Re: A Beovox MS150 Project

    My plan today was to start working on the MS150 cabinets. Setting them up on a workbench outside they don't look all that bad. I am going to start with just a good cleanup before deciding how far to go on any refinishing. The first annoying thing to clean is the duct tape residue on the bottom of the cabinets. I tried a cleaning product I have never tried before called Goo Gone. The orange colored liquid sprays on, then you wipe with a cloth unil the grime is gone. It worked really well as you
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Sat, Apr 21 2012
  • Re: A Beovox MS150 Project

    A couple of things came to mind as I re-examined my S120.2 speakers. One, I could steal the round plastic trim piece on the tweeter and midrange from one of the S120.2 cabinets and use in place of the scratched one on the MS150 cabinet. The thought there is that I have the grill covers for the S120.2 speakers so the trim piece can be hidden. I don't have the top grill cover for the MS150 speakers. The second thing was the S120.2 three inch midrange driver. After working on the MS150 midrange
    Posted to The Workbench (Forum) by sonavor on Sat, Apr 21 2012
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