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What Are You Reading Now?

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Jeff
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Jeff replied on Mon, Oct 14 2019 12:52 AM

I will look into Stapleton. And, I composed a reply earlier and it went into moderation for some reason, wonder if it'll ever show up?

Wait a minute, I've read Odd John, and quite enjoyed it. Will have to read more of his work. So many books, so much sitting on my butt instead of doing things that need done!

Jeff

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vikinger
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vikinger replied on Mon, Oct 14 2019 11:18 AM

I've just noticed that on that plaque there is a grammatical  error .... 'the bravery' should surely just read 'bravery'. Nobody seems to proof read anything these days.... no doubt a text editor failed to highlight it...... or maybe the text editor inserted it!

Graham

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Jeff replied on Mon, Oct 14 2019 3:55 PM

Spelling and grammatical errors are rampant these days it seems. Which is one reason I have to laugh when "journalists" tell us that we need to trust them over other news and information sources because the are "professionals." Sorry, the number of errors in basic things in your work does not instill confidence that your underlying reporting is any better or more accurate.

Still don't know where my other post went, off into the ether I guess.

I've also been called Conan the Grammarian at times, so this stuff really bugs me. But I guess proper use of language is so doubleplusungood.

Jeff

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Jeff replied on Sun, Oct 27 2019 10:04 PM

Well, I keep putting off reading some of my other books until I finish the "Revelation Space" series by Alistair Reynolds, now I'm about halfway thru the third, and realize that there are at least seven of the blasted things! I am enjoying the read, he's an innovative author, his deus ex machina tech is more physics based than most authors, and his story is fascinating to me. But it's also convoluted and connected enough I find it best not to wait too long between books that you lose the thread. So, I guess it's going to be a while before I move off of this. Not terrible, I enjoy his writing, but not the way to branch out to new things either. Ah well.

Jeff

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beocool replied on Mon, Oct 28 2019 9:52 AM

I just finished 'To cook a bear' by Mikael Niemi. I didn't know what to expect, as it was my first book by this author. The book is set in the village of Kengis in 1852. It's about the bond between the two central figures: pastor Lars Levi Laestadius, who was of great influence in the area, and a foundling boy as well as a crime story. It also gives a good insight in how life was back then. All together it's an interesting story outside of the boundaries of what I usually read.

 

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Jeff replied on Mon, Oct 28 2019 5:11 PM

That sounds interesting beocool. My desire to expand my reading into other authors has been put on hold due to my infatuation with the Revelation Space books. I only wish I'd realized not only how long they each were but how many of them there were before I got started, but in for a penny in for a pound as they say. And by the time I finish them the newest book in The Expanse franchise should be out. Surprise Another of my pleasures.

 

Jeff

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beocool replied on Sun, Nov 3 2019 4:50 PM

It sure was a good read, Jeff Smile I've been reading the first four novels by Tom Wood lately. Action packed books about an assassin named Vincent. Completely different from 'To cook a bear', but I quite enjoyed it.

 

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Jeff replied on Sun, Nov 3 2019 9:36 PM

I've looked and on Amazon the only novel by Niemi I can find in English is "Popular Music From Vittula." Do you recommend it? It sounds interesting from the description but I have not often found coming of age novels to be my cup of tea, but if I want to read this author this is about all I can find.

I'm about 80% thru the book I'm reading now. Only 4 more novels to go in the series, unless he manages to publish an 8th before I get to the end. Stick out tongue


Jeff

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beocool replied on Mon, Nov 4 2019 9:06 AM

I'd love to help you out here, Jeff, but I'm afraid I'm not the one to ask. I never heard of this writer before until I saw 'To cook a bear' in the new books section at the library. I picked it up because I was intrigued by the title and decided to give a go. Unfortunately it's the only book by Niemi that the library has.

 

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Jeff
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Jeff replied on Mon, Nov 4 2019 5:02 PM

beocool:

I'd love to help you out here, Jeff, but I'm afraid I'm not the one to ask. I never heard of this writer before until I saw 'To cook a bear' in the new books section at the library. I picked it up because I was intrigued by the title and decided to give a go. Unfortunately it's the only book by Niemi that the library has.

Ah, thanks beocool! The book, in Kindle form, isn't very expensive so I might give it a try, if only to try and broaden my reading experience. I've also got a couple of Murakami novels I need to get to.

Jeff

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beocool replied on Tue, Dec 24 2019 4:38 PM

Had a break from reading, but it's back to the books now. I've read Camilla Läckberg's 'Kvinnor utan nåd', which would translate to 'women without mercy'. It's better than her previous book, but not nearly as good as her Fjällbacka murders series. 

Also read Kevin Barry's 'Night boat to Tangier'. That book is about two criminal friends who are looking for the disappeared daughter of one of them Spanish port city of Algeciras. They also look back and reflect on their friendship and their lives. Dark and well written, but I think a lot got lost in the Dutch translation. Better stick to the original.

Now reading Dov Alfon's 'Unit 8200'.

 

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Jeff replied on Tue, Dec 24 2019 7:17 PM

I've had a break lately too, too much going on on many levels preparing for the holiday, repairs to the house, etc. By the time I get some free time later in the evenings I've just been plopping down and watching an hour or so of TV before bedtime. Not sure what I'll broach next in reading though, lot to choose from in my library.

You mention translations, sadly not every tale translates well from the original language. I've read a couple of Japanese authors that seem to translate well, how well I guess I have no idea. They might be even more impressive and deep in the original Japanese but at least the English translations were captivating.

I have been rereading a book, "The Bell Curve," which is a study of human intelligence but it's heavy reading so I just am glancing at it off and on, not a steady serious read at the moment. Not something that I can't put down as it were.

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Jeff replied on Fri, Jan 10 2020 5:52 PM

I've just started reading "Angora Fever: The Collected Stories Of Edward D. Wood, Jr." Apparently Ed Wood wrote in addition to making movies, especially after his movie directing career cratered. The stories appeared in the pulp magazines of the day, crime stories and adult stories mainly. Just have gotten started, but as lurid as they are he was a much better writer than a movie director. Definitely something, well, unusual.

 

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beocool replied on Sat, Jan 11 2020 6:07 PM

Now that you've mentioned Japanese authors: A while ago I've read 'Tokyo Tapes nr 6-4' by Hideo Yokoyama. Good book, but not easy to read, especially the first two hundred pages or so.

It's about the kidnapping case of Shoko, the seven-year-old daughter of the owners of a large company. She was abducted in 1989 and found dead after a failed ransom award. After fourteen years this crime still has not been solved. Mikami, the detective who was involved in this case back in 1989 has to visit Shoko's parents again. Then he notices something a small detail, which is new to him. At that point a complex story unfolds that exposes the corruption of police, media and government. 

 

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Jeff replied on Sat, Jan 11 2020 6:33 PM

beocool:

Now that you've mentioned Japanese authors: A while ago I've read 'Tokyo Tapes nr 6-4' by Hideo Yokoyama. Good book, but not easy to read, especially the first two hundred pages or so.

It's about the kidnapping case of Shoko, the seven-year-old daughter of the owners of a large company. She was abducted in 1989 and found dead after a failed ransom award. After fourteen years this crime still has not been solved. Mikami, the detective who was involved in this case back in 1989 has to visit Shoko's parents again. Then he notices something a small detail, which is new to him. At that point a complex story unfolds that exposes the corruption of police, media and government. 

That sounds interesting. I've enjoyed the Japanese authors I've read. "The Wind Up Bird Chronicle" and "Kafka On The Shore" by Haruki Murakami, and "The Ark Sakura" and "The Woman In The Dunes" by Kobo Abe. The latter novel was made into a movie as well.

Between the two, Abe is definitely more "out there" to my Western sensibilities than Murakami, but very enjoyable and unique regardless of surreality, maybe because of it.

Speaking of odd Japanese things, I recently watched the uncut version of "Tokyo Decadence" and it was very odd. It's the story of a naive, withdrawn young woman who is working as a submissive prostitute in Tokyo, and who still is in love with a married older musician who left her.

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beocool replied on Mon, Jan 13 2020 11:45 AM

Jeff:
Speaking of odd Japanese things, I recently watched the uncut version of "Tokyo Decadence" and it was very odd. It's the story of a naive, withdrawn young woman who is working as a submissive prostitute in Tokyo, and who still is in love with a married older musician who left her.

I think I saw a part of that movie too with German voice over. Probably at least 15 years back or more. Back to books: I read the sequel to Tokyo Tapes nr 6-4 as well: Japan Airlines nr. 123. The title indicates it's about the infamous plane crash. Hideo Yokoyama was working at a newspaper at the time of the crash (1985) and wasn't allowed to write about it by the management. The book again is mostly about Japanese culture and the situation in the work environment. It's easier to read than Tokyo Tapes nr 6-4, but somehow less satisfying.

 

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vikinger replied on Sun, Jan 19 2020 11:03 AM

Having received a book token, not redeemable at abebooks, I went on line to look for bargains at various retailers. Eventually I settled on two 'Bargains', a signed copy of ‘Ness’ by Robert Macfarlane (illustrated by Stanley Donwood, and a book by Stanley Donwood himself called 'Humor'. (Donwood is the Radio Head cover illustrator.)

I've read Ness, and I am just digging into Humor. Maybe it's my age, but both volumes seem to have a naive thread more suited to a younger generation. Ness is clearly based on the abandoned Orford Ness armaments testing station, now overgrown and in the hands of the National Trust. References to the characters descending on a building called the Green Chapel suggest that the author has read Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and is attempting a vague update into the nuclear age. 
'Humor' intro suggests that this is a collection of short stories based on Donwood's personal nightmares.  I haven't got far with it yet.

Book Bargains. Are they? Ness started as a limited edition 2 years ago at £45. The normal hardback followed at £14.99. Mine, signed by the author, £10.99. If Macfarlane gains in notoriety my purchase may be worth it just for the signature. However, if Macfarlane is in the habit of sitting down and signing everything he gets published...... who knows?

Graham

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Jeff replied on Sun, Jan 19 2020 4:19 PM

Interesting. I know signed copies values vary depending on the author and how many they sign of course, but it's not something I've ever pursued. I know some people love to collect signed first editions. I have only one book signed by the author, it's a book written by the navigator on the Enola Gay, the plane that bombed Hiroshima. The old gentleman came through town here on a book tour, spoke at the local civic center, and I had him autograph the book. Fascinating fellow to chat with, a true witness to history.

I'm afraid anymore I've gotten to where 99+% of the books I buy are E Format, aging eyes like the ability to scale text up. When did they start printing books in such small print!?! I still prefer the tactile sense of a real book, but at least I can easily read on the Kindle. Plus I always have a book on my phone when I get stuck somewhere, like waiting for an appointment or such.

Jeff

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valve1 replied on Mon, Jan 20 2020 4:02 AM

+1 0n Kindle Jeff

I used to travel a lot using connecting flights where I could be stuck in an airport for 4-6 hours. I could never understand why I would arrive at my destination exhausted and only fit for a beer . 

I eventually bought a Kindle and the sore eyes vanished. Airports and European Hotels are poorly lit so the backlighting on the Kindle is a lifesaver for me.

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Jeff replied on Mon, Jan 20 2020 11:48 AM

My wife was an early adopter of e-books. She used to travel a fair amount for work, and had me drive across town one night before a trip to pick up a first gen Sony Reader. By the time she wore it out and was on the 2nd gen one I had one too for travel, the ability to have a couple of hundred books with you at all times in a slim device was just a godsend for traveling.

And eyestrain will wear you out, a good backlit display is wonderful in poor light.

Jeff

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beocool replied on Fri, Feb 7 2020 11:50 AM

I'm a little behind with posting here: I've read 'Hunting dogs' by Jorn Lier Horst, a crime novel in the William Wisting series. It's about the discovery that evidence was falsified in a high profile murder case seventeen years ago, which results in the suspension of the protagonist WIlliam Wisting. The media is all over it. The only exception is his daughter Line, herself a journalist. Wisting decides to investigate the case while he is suspended.

A well written novel in the Scandinavian crime genre.

 

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beocool replied on Sat, Feb 8 2020 11:31 AM

Next a copy of 'Carrie' by Stephen King made its way in my home. I've never read anything by mr. King before and this book is seen as a bit of a modern classic, but I don't like it all that much. The story is about a high school girl Carrie White who has extraordinary telekinetic powers. She takes revenge on a massive scale after she's been bullied. Trouble is, you already now that is going to happen from the start and there's not really a climax in the story.

 

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Jeff replied on Sat, Feb 8 2020 2:55 PM

I have to admit, I'm not a fan of Steven King either. I've read a couple of his things, including "Pet Semetary" and they always seem to me that they would have made good novellas, or long short stories, but instead were these repetitive, drawn out 1000 page plus wastes of time. Like you, I can usually predict what's coming in the first quarter of the book, they are predictable and overly verbose. I like horror, but more in the vein of H.P. Lovecraft and Poe.

You got me thinking though, about crime novels, and I've only ever read two that I can recall. "Red Dragon" which is the first Hannibal Lecter book, and "Hell Hath No Fury" which is a 1950s femme fatale/crime noir novel, which was the basis for the movie "The Hot Spot" which was directed by Dennis Hopper and was a very good noir kind of movie set in a very hot Texas small town.

I'm kind of in between books at the moment, need to get back to reading something soon.

Jeff

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beocool replied on Sun, Feb 9 2020 11:51 AM

Thank you for your suggestions. I haven't read 'Red Dragon' or 'Hell Hath No Fury', but they seem to be rather interesting. 

Seems I got lucky with my first go on Stephen King as 'Carrie' is only about 200 pages or so Big Smile. I probably wouldn't make it to page 1,000. I swapped the book at one of the miniature libraries for 'Tools of Titans' by Tim Ferriss. I kind of missed the whole hype around this author and his books and didn't expect all that much of it to be honest. Tim Ferriss advises not too read the whole book, it's nearly 700 pages. Naturally I ignored his advise and read it from cover to cover Stick out tongue It's divided into three parts:

  • healthy: doctors, researches and top athletes share their routines and strategies.
  • Wealthy: Lots of advice from investors and businesspeople.
  • Wise: On learning how to learn

There are quite a few ideas that are a bit of a stretch for me personally, but still interesting. Some more practical information as well. I enjoyed it and will keep this book as reference work.

 

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Jeff replied on Sun, Feb 9 2020 4:01 PM

I think "Hell Hath No Fury" made a better movie than it is a book. It's that 1950s pulp fiction writing style that I enjoyed OK but a little goes a long way, not exactly fine literature. I can recommend the movie "The Hot Spot" though, you could watch that movie in the dead of winter and still feel overheated, it captures a sultry Texas summer well. Plus the love interest gets plenty sweaty. Don Johnson, Virginia Madsen, and Jennifer Connelly.

Jeff

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beocool replied on Mon, Feb 10 2020 10:52 AM

Thanks, Jeff, I'll keep that in mind.

Next book I've read was 'Run' by Blake Crouch. It's about a lot of people in America who saw an aurora borealis and go crazy after that. They are able to recognize people who haven't seen it and start killing them. The family of the protagonists (Jack, Dee and their two children) know that they are after them and go on a post-apocalyptic road trip to Canada to escape their killers. The book is a little monotonous: both the sustained and inexplicably psychopathic violence and the long hard trek through the wilderness... Still better than the Stephen King, though.

 

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Jeff replied on Mon, Feb 10 2020 4:27 PM

That's interesting, there have been several similar stories with varying triggers, alien pods in Invasion Of The Body Snatchers, digital signals, viruses, contaminants, this is the first I've heard about with an aurora. I guess people living in the South would be immune?

The noir book wasn't bad, don't get me wrong, it'd just it's kind of a time capsule of the style of writing that's kind of gone out of favor, but I kind of enjoyed it just because of that.

In the film Johnson plays a sleazy slick salesman who blows into town and gets a job at the local car lot, run by a man with a much younger oversexed wife played by Madsen. Johnson and the wife are kind of circling each other, talking about what to do in town.

Her: You could join the ladies club and collect trash. Now there's a hot hobby.

Him. I doubt I'd pass the credentials.

Her: Oh I think if you approached them one at a time you'd be lucky if you ever got your credentials back.

Jeff

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beocool replied on Tue, Feb 11 2020 6:30 AM

In the book the aurora was seen in 48 of the 50 states in the US. The story starts in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Oddly enough further north, in Canada, there was no mention of it and there it's safe. Indeed an unusual geographical spread of the aurora borealis phenomenon.

My next book was Snowblind by Ragnar Jónasson. It is the first novel in his Dark Iceland series and it was written in 2010. The Dutch translation only became available this year and I was the first person to borrow it from the library. The story is set in Siglufjörður, a small fishing town in Northern Iceland. The only access to the town is by boat, a derelict airstrip or via a small mountain tunnel. The writer does a good job of painting a claustrophobic picture. I grew up in a village similar in size, but much less isolated and I think he captured the atmosphere really good. The first three quarter of the book is written in a really slow pace. The protagonist is Ari Thór Arason a rookie policeman that left his hometown Reykjavik and his girlfriend behind. He is clearly seen as an outsider. He is confronted with two cases that are first treated as an accident, but in the end the mystery comes together in an Agatha Christie kind of way. A nicely written novel, even though it lacks the depth and historic background that you can find in Arnaldur Indriðason's work. I'm looking forward to the sequel.

 

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beocool replied on Wed, Feb 12 2020 9:38 AM

Back to nonfiction again: I next read 'Goodbye things' by Fumio Sasaki, again borrowed from the library. He sees him himself as a regular guy, yet he owns so little that most of us would be hoarders in comparison. It would cost him 20 minutes to pack all his belongings.

In the book he makes 70 claims on how minimalism would benefit your life and I must say most of them are compelling, while a few others are a bit farfetched. While the book is only 250 pages or so, it could have been a lot shorter if he used a more minimalist approach to writing, but then again there wouldn't have been much of a book to sell. 

 

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Jeff replied on Wed, Feb 12 2020 1:30 PM

beocool:

Back to nonfiction again: I next read 'Goodbye things' by Fumio Sasaki, again borrowed from the library. He sees him himself as a regular guy, yet he owns so little that most of us would be hoarders in comparison. It would cost him 20 minutes to pack all his belongings.

In the book he makes 70 claims on how minimalism would benefit your life and I must say most of them are compelling, while a few others are a bit farfetched. While the book is only 250 pages or so, it could have been a lot shorter if he used a more minimalist approach to writing, but then again there wouldn't have been much of a book to sell. 

Big Smile

I have always liked minimalism though I have way too much stuff even with all that. It's a hard habit to break, for example despite not needing it I just bought a BM2400, BG4002, and a BC5000. Go figure. I sometimes wonder if the house burned down and I restarted from scratch I'd be better off. I have legacy stuff, and things I inherited from my in-laws that I have no place for and which are not to my taste but which are fairly valuable pieces I don't feel like just trashing but which can't easily be sold. A spinet harpsichord for example. A set of Japanese painted screens for another. I tend to think living your life in a kind of stream of consciousness way has advantages.

I've started the book about Pancho Barnes and her Happy Bottom Riding Club, I mentioned the short documentary on her in the what are you watching thread, and am enjoying it. She was quite a woman, real hell on wheels, or wings, type. She wanted her preacher husband (mother arranged marriage) to give her a divorce and he kept not agreeing until she rode a horse naked up the steps into his church, up to the pulpit, and back out. Apparently this did the trick when her constant buzzing of the church during services in her plane didn't. She offered anyone who broke the sound barrier a free steak dinner up at Edwards AFB, but then it got to where she was giving so many of them away she only did it if you set a new speed record. Fascinating woman.

Jeff

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beocool replied on Thu, Feb 13 2020 11:37 AM

Last book, for now at least, I've read is 'The subtle art of not giving a f*ck' by Mark Manson. Like the Tim Ferriss' books, I was aware of it, but the hype escaped me completely. I stumbled upon it in the library and decided to give it a go.

I'm not exactly a fan of the self-help genre. At least this book isn't about positive thinking, but more about:

  • accepting one's limitations
  • taking responsibility for one's own action, which made me remind of Jocko Willink's extreme ownership.
  • chosing what is important to you and disregard the rest, in a way a nod to minimalism
  • failure is good as it can lead to growth. 
This book was a huge success and it's easy to see why: it's short and to the point, mixed with some of the writers' personal experiences. The use of language and theme of the book make it clear it's aimed at the Millennial generation. As such it's pretty unique I reckon. But there is nothing in the book that you can't learn from other sources.

 

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beocool replied on Thu, Feb 13 2020 11:38 AM

Jeff:
I've started the book about Pancho Barnes and her Happy Bottom Riding Club, I mentioned the short documentary on her in the what are you watching thread, and am enjoying it. She was quite a woman, real hell on wheels, or wings, type. She wanted her preacher husband (mother arranged marriage) to give her a divorce and he kept not agreeing until she rode a horse naked up the steps into his church, up to the pulpit, and back out. Apparently this did the trick when her constant buzzing of the church during services in her plane didn't. She offered anyone who broke the sound barrier a free steak dinner up at Edwards AFB, but then it got to where she was giving so many of them away she only did it if you set a new speed record. Fascinating woman.

That sounds like a good read, Jeff Smile

 

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Jeff replied on Thu, Feb 13 2020 3:33 PM

That book sounds interesting beocool, a tough love kind of "self help" book. Short on touchy feely stuff and longer on "grow the hell up" stuff. Something, sadly, the younger generations that have been raised with the everybody gets a trophy approach truly need. Yes, I'm an old curmudgeon, proud pipe and slippers brigade. Your music sucks and get off of my lawn! Big Smile

But the author is on the right track. Looking back on my life, most of the bad things that happened were either my fault, or if not they were often made worse by how I reacted to them. I'm older now, and pretty comfortable with who I am. As the old saying goes, not only am I not the man I used to be, to be honest I never was. One thing I've found that age does seem to confer on a person is more self awareness.

On the Pancho Barnes book, she was flying as a stunt pilot on Howard Hughes's  movie "Hell's Angels" and apparently the flying was very dangerous, the planes had to get very close to each other and to the camera planes. She said the pay, 5 dollars a day, was way too low, Hughes told her to buzz off. So she got everyone organized, and formed a stunt pilots union, and in the end they were getting 50 bucks a day. Quite a look into the early days of aviation.

Jeff

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vikinger replied on Fri, Feb 14 2020 9:16 AM

As a (when they existed) Saab enthusiast, I recently discovered a book called 'Water Music' 'of 'Salmon Saab’s and Spey Rods' by David Swanson and published by Meadow Run Press. There are two limited edition versions of this book, currently on AbeBooks with prices from £9 to £800 or thereabouts.

I bought a lower priced limited edition (1500) signed by the author. What a beautifully presented book it is, in a clam case. (I've since noticed that Meadow Run Press specialise in very expensive sporting books.)

This is a story of fishing for salmon in Norway, interwoven with a 1999 policy whereby Saab would allow Americans to collect their new Saab at the Trollhatten factory, stay at hotel(s) at Saab’s expense, drive around Europe, and then have the car delivered to the US for the same cost as if you had just gone to a Saab retailer in the US in the first place. An entertaining story, with, for me, reminisces of a great car manufacturer mismanaged and killed by GM.

Graham

Jeff
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Jeff replied on Fri, Feb 14 2020 2:49 PM

I truly miss Saab, a unique company. I knew an aerodynamicist back when who drove a 900 turbo, mid 80s, she still has it from what I hear.

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

Cleviebaby
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vikinger:

As a (when they existed) Saab enthusiast, I recently discovered a book called 'Water Music' 'of 'Salmon Saab’s and Spey Rods' by David Swanson and published by Meadow Run Press. There are two limited edition versions of this book, currently on AbeBooks with prices from £9 to £800 or thereabouts.

I bought a lower priced limited edition (1500) signed by the author. What a beautifully presented book it is, in a clam case. (I've since noticed that Meadow Run Press specialise in very expensive sporting books.)

This is a story of fishing for salmon in Norway, interwoven with a 1999 policy whereby Saab would allow Americans to collect their new Saab at the Trollhatten factory, stay at hotel(s) at Saab’s expense, drive around Europe, and then have the car delivered to the US for the same cost as if you had just gone to a Saab retailer in the US in the first place. An entertaining story, with, for me, reminisces of a great car manufacturer mismanaged and killed by GM.

Graham

Like Graham, I share a love of SAABs and I’ve just ordered the book he recommended.

As for Jeff’s aerodynamicist, I’d have to wonder about her choice of car. My old SAAB 900 Turbo had the aerodynamics of a brick!

Cleve
Jeff
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Jeff replied on Sat, Feb 15 2020 5:11 PM

I remember at the time I believe the advertising was meant to infer that the Saab was aero becausee Saab made jet fighters, anyway it had a rear spoiler and an air dam so it looked aero. And back in the mid 80's a lot of cars had bad aerodynamics, it wasn't as important as it is now. Aero meant fins at one time too.

I remember the car, black on black. Had a heck of a turbo rush too. I guess it's still kind of odd for an aero person to stick with it that long when slicker things come along.

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

beocool
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beocool replied on Thu, Feb 20 2020 4:00 PM

vikinger:

As a (when they existed) Saab enthusiast, I recently discovered a book called 'Water Music' 'of 'Salmon Saab’s and Spey Rods' by David Swanson and published by Meadow Run Press. There are two limited edition versions of this book, currently on AbeBooks with prices from £9 to £800 or thereabouts.

I bought a lower priced limited edition (1500) signed by the author. What a beautifully presented book it is, in a clam case. (I've since noticed that Meadow Run Press specialise in very expensive sporting books.)

This is a story of fishing for salmon in Norway, interwoven with a 1999 policy whereby Saab would allow Americans to collect their new Saab at the Trollhatten factory, stay at hotel(s) at Saab’s expense, drive around Europe, and then have the car delivered to the US for the same cost as if you had just gone to a Saab retailer in the US in the first place. An entertaining story, with, for me, reminisces of a great car manufacturer mismanaged and killed by GM.

Graham

Sounds like a good read. The automotive landscape is surely a poorer place with Saab gone. I'm sure you've read 'A man called Ove' by Fredrik Backman. I have and totally enjoyed it. They made a movie too, which I also watched a couple of years ago. Slightly different from the book, but also very enjoyable. With Saab gone and you being a strong advocate of the brand I'm wondering what are you driving right now?

 

Vähintään yhdeksänkymmentä prosenttia suomalainen! 

beocool
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beocool replied on Thu, Feb 20 2020 4:19 PM

Sometimes things come together in an unusual way. A couple of days ago I had a wardrobe malfunction; not the kind that makes you embarrassed in public, but a rod snapped in the wardrobe, leaving me with less space to hang my clothes. 

I decided to rearrange everything in the wardrobe, but not after reading 'The life changing magic of tidying' and 'Spark joy' by Marie Kondo. Until very recently I've never heard of her - one of the benefits of not watching TV - but she was mentioned in Fumio Sasaki's book 'Goodbye things' which I only finished reading last week. Turns out I've been doing about 80% of what she is writing about all along. Both books are fairly short, about 200 and 250 pages and easy to read, but lots of it is about her personal journey to becoming the person she is right now and how she interacts with clients and their belongings. 

So my conclusion is that like Fumio Sasaki's book these books too could have been a lot shorter as I was only interested in the best and most efficient way of packing my belongings. That said, my wardrobe looks a little better now, so worth the effort. I wouldn't buy these books, but it's nice to have library card Wink

 

Vähintään yhdeksänkymmentä prosenttia suomalainen! 

Jeff
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Jeff replied on Thu, Feb 20 2020 4:38 PM

Isn't having a library card very much in keeping with the minimalist, clutter free lifestyle espoused in the books? Stick out tongue

My wife and I fight this battle constantly with things, especially books. We had a small library at our last house, about 10 ft by 10 ft, but it was crammed with bookshelves. We used to have to do periodic purges, as we kept buying books, go thru and evaluate chances of rereading this or that vs space issues. Was always so hard to move books on (donated to the library for their book sales). Our current library is enormous, but you'd not tell it as much by looking as for every book on the shelf we have at least 10 in memory. Of course organizing and cleaning up a virtual library so you can find things has its own challenges as well.

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

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