Sign in   |  Join   |  Help

What Are You Reading Now?

rated by 0 users
This post has 180 Replies | 3 Followers

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
Posts 5,285
OFFLINE
Gold Member
vikinger replied on Mon, May 7 2018 11:05 AM

I had a tendency in the past to look for rare books or books of local interest on Abebooks or eBay and I would often just put them on the shelves after a cursory look. I've just taken one off the shelf ‘Foul Bills and Dagger Money' by *** Hamilton, who was a barrister back in the 1950's. Great reading including trial by ordeal in the time of King Alfred onwards. I hadn't realised until picking up this book that Circuit Judges (a term still in use in the U.K.) used to pick the circuit around which they wanted to ride from court to court. Different circuits had different perks for the judge......

Graham

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
Posts 5,285
OFFLINE
Gold Member
vikinger replied on Mon, May 7 2018 11:12 AM

What is wrong with the auto-moderation on this site? The asterisks above replace the common abbreviation for Richard (as used by the author). Strange that the auto system cannot identify a string that is clearly part of a name.

Graham

Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Mon, May 7 2018 1:33 PM

vikinger:

What is wrong with the auto-moderation on this site? The asterisks above replace the common abbreviation for Richard (as used by the author). Strange that the auto system cannot identify a string that is clearly part of a name.

Graham

I first encountered this when talking about a book by Philip K. ***, seems it hasn't changed. A stern mistress is our nanny. Stick out tongue

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

CB
Top 75 Contributor
> You are Here <
Posts 1,264
OFFLINE
Gold Member
CB replied on Mon, May 7 2018 2:53 PM
“today” in French is also moderated Unsure
Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Mon, May 7 2018 7:09 PM

CB:
“today” in French is also moderated Unsure

Unless my translation is way off, that doesn't even make sense!

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

chartz
Top 25 Contributor
Burgundy, France
Posts 3,765
ONLINE
Bronze Member
chartz replied on Mon, May 7 2018 8:04 PM
Jeff:

"Still Alice" sounds very emotional but not going to be reading or watching it. We're living it sadly with my mother-in-law. I've watched a brilliant lady turn into what's basically a potted plant over the last 4 years, and it's been especially hard on her children.

Yes. The other half’s godfather is gradually becoming that as well. And he too was a teacher.

Jacques

Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Mon, May 7 2018 11:42 PM

chartz:
Jeff:

 

"Still Alice" sounds very emotional but not going to be reading or watching it. We're living it sadly with my mother-in-law. I've watched a brilliant lady turn into what's basically a potted plant over the last 4 years, and it's been especially hard on her children.

 

 

Yes. The other half’s godfather is gradually becoming that as well. And he too was a teacher.

 

I'm very sorry to hear it Jacques, it's very hard to watch. I'm not sure if it's because people are living longer or what but it sure seems to be becoming more prevalent sadly.

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
Posts 5,285
OFFLINE
Gold Member
vikinger replied on Tue, Jun 26 2018 11:52 AM

Picked up a book whilst on a weekend away.... at a National Trust thrift book shop. Large hardbacks suggested donation £2, paperbacks £1....... .

Large hardback, "Parrot and Olivier in America" by Peter Carey. (Apparently it was a Man Booker Prize shortlister 2010).

Adventure from the time of the French Revolution and how a french aristocrat and english engraver/ forger were thrown together. It gradually reveals that the englishman has had a far more adventurous life, including living in Australiia. (The author is Australian). Great descriptions of life in Connecticut.

Really well written, but as with so many books (in my experience) slightly unsatisfactory at the end where the author probably struggled to conclude the great story he has created.

Graham

Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Tue, Jun 26 2018 12:57 PM

Thanks for the recommendation Graham, books like that, usually found in dusty corners of used books shops, often turn out to be quite interesting. Bummer about the observation on the ending, but like you I notice this as well with many books as well as movies and TV shows. They do great for the first 75 percent then wake up and realize they have to solve all of these loose ends and such in almost no time, and seem to panic and just start sticking things together that don't fit and/or are far too simplistic.

The old joke about Star Trek: The Next Generation was that every problem on the ship could be solved by reconfiguring the main deflector screen. Damn, my Earl Gray tea is not only not hot, but the food replicator gave me coffee instead! Geordi, reconfigure the deflector screen!

On one such odd fishing expedition in an old book store my wife found a copy of "Headhunting In The Solomon Islands," which was a delightful book about two young ladies, slightly post WWII period, suddenly decided to go and paint/sketch/photograph people in the Solomon islands and see if they could round up any headhunters. So, off they went, can you imagine two young women surviving the places they went nowadays without issues?

That's also how I came across a very funny and sadly out of print book by Lt. Roger Hall called "You're Stepping On My Cloak And Dagger," which is a very humorously written take on his joining the OSS (precursor to the CIA) in WWII and his subsequent training and such.

Right now I'm reading "Darkly Dreaming Dexter" which is the first book in the series that also spawned the TV series called "Dexter," about a socially conscious serial killer in Miami who only kills people who the police have missed or couldn't jail properly due to the courts. Very well written.

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
Posts 5,285
OFFLINE
Gold Member
vikinger replied on Wed, Jun 27 2018 11:18 AM

Jeff:

That's also how I came across a very funny and sadly out of print book by Lt. Roger Hall called "You're Stepping On My Cloak And Dagger," which is a very humorously written take on his joining the OSS (precursor to the CIA) in WWII and his subsequent training and such.

Hi Jeff, that comment made me do a bit of research about the book and its (very favourable) reviews. Many early copies are now quite expensive, and getting a copy sent from the US to U.K. incurs stupidly expensive postal charges with most booksellers. However, I have found a copy of the 2004 reprint online at a Berlin bookshop, and they will send it post free to the UK for £5 total! Looking forward to reading it.

Graham

Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Wed, Jun 27 2018 1:27 PM

vikinger:

Jeff:

That's also how I came across a very funny and sadly out of print book by Lt. Roger Hall called "You're Stepping On My Cloak And Dagger," which is a very humorously written take on his joining the OSS (precursor to the CIA) in WWII and his subsequent training and such.

Hi Jeff, that comment made me do a bit of research about the book and its (very favourable) reviews. Many early copies are now quite expensive, and getting a copy sent from the US to U.K. incurs stupidly expensive postal charges with most booksellers. However, I have found a copy of the 2004 reprint online at a Berlin bookshop, and they will send it post free to the UK for £5 total! Looking forward to reading it.

Graham

Excellent Graham! I hope you enjoy it. I remember when I was in London last, some years ago, being near Hyde Park, which reminded me of his description of it, he described Hyde Park as the largest collection of anti-aircraft guns ever assembled in the world, and since his hotel was next to this it made him feel good, until he found out that the first objective of every German attack on London was to knock out the Hyde Park battery.

I remember reading not long ago that the cookbook "A Treasury Of Great Recipes" by Vincent and Mary Price (yes, that Vincent Price) which went out of print in the mid 60's was the 8th most sought after used book, I'm assuming they meant in the US. They rereleased it in 2015, I have my wife's mother's copy from the early 60s. I never ever would have thought that was such a sought after old book!

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
Posts 5,285
OFFLINE
Gold Member

Hi Jeff, “You're Stepping on my Cloak and Dagger” arrived in the morning post. Virtually ‘As New’ condition.

Hilarious and well written. Difficult to put down! How do books like this get overlooked by mainstream publishers?

Graham

Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Tue, Jul 3 2018 7:46 PM

Glad you're enjoying it Graham! I know what you mean, gems like this get overlooked, while some truly dreadful novels and such become bestsellers, go figure.

I remember the first time I read it I often found myself laughing out loud, same as when I first read Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy.

I've just finished the first Dexter book, Darkly Dreaming Dexter, and have moved on to reading a collection of the late Harlan Ellison's stories, Strange Wine, which is as dark as you'd expect from him. Been a while since I've read it so with one or two exceptions I'm finding the stories fresh.

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
Posts 5,285
OFFLINE
Gold Member
vikinger replied on Sat, Jul 21 2018 3:24 PM

Jeff:

Glad you're enjoying it Graham! I know what you mean, gems like this get overlooked, while some truly dreadful novels and such become bestsellers, go figure.

I remember the first time I read it I often found myself laughing out loud, same as when I first read Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy.

I've just finished the first Dexter book, Darkly Dreaming Dexter, and have moved on to reading a collection of the late Harlan Ellison's stories, Strange Wine, which is as dark as you'd expect from him. Been a while since I've read it so with one or two exceptions I'm finding the stories fresh.

Well, You're Stepping on my Cloak and Dagger was a brilliantly written book, and although about the end of WW2 and the late 40's it deserves another reprint.

i managed to get hold of another Roger Hall book, ‘19, A Story'. Although this time fictional, and perhaps a little contrived, you couldn't help wondering how much of this CIA based story reflected Roger Hall's own life. Did he really get by writing the odd novel,(as suggested by his 2008 obituary) or was he, like the hero of 19, always in one of the secret services, using the profession of author as a front?

Graham

Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Sat, Jul 21 2018 3:59 PM

I haven't read any of Hall's other work, should start looking for some now. You wonder about the spooks like him, what's a real career and what's a cover?

Right now I'm reading "Deathbird Stories" by Harlan Ellison. Truly some dark and depressing tales but as always very well written, poetic even.

Plus there's the advantage of perspective, after reading Ellison, even the mess of the world as it exists today seems optimistic. Crying

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Sat, Jul 21 2018 4:43 PM

Haven't found "19, A Story" as yet, but have found out that, at least here in the US, "You're Stepping On My Cloak And Dagger" is available as a Kindle book!

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

CB
Top 75 Contributor
> You are Here <
Posts 1,264
OFFLINE
Gold Member
CB replied on Sat, Jul 21 2018 6:27 PM
Jeff:
Plus there's the advantage of perspective, after reading Ellison, even the mess of the world as it exists today seems optimistic.

Huh? Indifferent Sad StormStormStorm

Not for me then...
Anders Jørgensen
Top 200 Contributor
Denmark
Posts 346
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

Another re-read of this classic. So much depth!

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
Posts 5,285
OFFLINE
Gold Member
vikinger replied on Mon, Aug 6 2018 10:56 PM

Just finished reading “An Officer and A Spy” by Robert Harris, a story closely following the real life Dreyfus Affair of France at the end of the 19th Century.

How an innocent man was condemned by the French military and legal systems. There are still so many parallels that one can imagine going on right now with our present day spies and politicians.

Graham

Jeff
Top 50 Contributor
USA
Posts 3,212
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Tue, Aug 7 2018 12:24 AM

Sounds interesting, I just looked up the Dreyfus Affair, and it's indeed shocking, but sadly not unusual. Witch hunts, show trials, and scapegoats, have always been around, miscarriages of justice are depressingly all too real. When entrenched elements of the government decide to railroad you, there's precious little that can be done, and if there is anything done it can take years to fight back.

I'm currently reading a collection of Harlan Ellison stories, "I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream," which begins with the story of the same name. Unsettling. I reread the Roger Hall book, and found it all I remembered, and also finished a book "The Nasty Bits" which is a collection of essays and articles written by Anthony Bourdain.

Jeff

Beovirus victim, it's gotten to be too much to list!

Anders Jørgensen
Top 200 Contributor
Denmark
Posts 346
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Currently rereading:

The Science of getting rich but Wallace D Wattles.

Again so much to depth to understand and apply. Still great education.

Page 5 of 5 (181 items) < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 | RSS
Beoworld Security Certificate

SSL