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Best way to further reduce bass on M5

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Steve
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Australia
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Steve posted on Tue, Oct 13 2020 2:08 AM

I have an M3, A6 and now a bronze M5.

Im very happy with all, but need advice on how to further reduce bass on the M5. 

Sitting on my wooden sideboard, depending on the music selected (and at the lowest bass setting), it still vibrates many surrounding objects.

 

Besides placing it on concrete or marble table  - any suggestions on what I can do?

Sitting on foam ? Rubber ? are there any floor or wall mounts that anyone can recommend?

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trackbeo
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Steve:
at the lowest bass setting), it still vibrates many surrounding objects.
In addition to lowering the bass with the app, you can also affect it by choosing a position in Sound Settings.  Choose "Corner" even if it isn't -- because the app knows that corner placement reinforces bass, it will lower it more than "Wall" or "Free" positions.  Also in Sound Settings, you can set Loudness to "Off", just to prevent the bass boost at low volumes, though probably at low volumes you aren't having the problem?

But if you have already done this and also turned down the bass, then you are just "lucky": impressive, newly-to-you reproduced, lower frequencies are playing at resonances of your objects!  (1) If those "surrounding" objects contact the sideboard, of course move them off.  (2) The inverse square law works: move the speaker just a little farther from the objects, or vice versa.  Also repositioning will change how the speaker interacts with any "room modes" and you might get lucky to avoid reinforcement at precisely one frequency exciting your objects.  (3) What you asked: Yes, vibrations caused by physical transmission can be fixed with neoprene or sorbothane pads or feet underneath the speaker.  But this only helps with physical vibrations transmitted into the top surface of the sideboard, thru its legs, into the floor, and from there into the surrounding objects. (Also the surface of the sideboard can act like a soundboard of a musical instrument, but presumably you would have felt it and noticed if that were the problem.)  That's a long way to travel, and pretty unlikely for such a small speaker -- it's more likely that...  (4) The (normal) sound vibrations in the air are the cause, and you just happen to have some very finicky placement of metal blinds or whatever.  Again remember that wall or corner placement reinforces the bass so move the speaker out of such a position, and likewise, the bass will be at its loudest right against the wall or ceiling, so take your objects and move them off the walls, or add tiny felt bumpers so they don't buzz against the wallboard.

[Edit: Sorry, forgot to mention the usual vibration absorbers, because I think moving the speaker is your best option.  There are feet for just such a purpose: SVS, the people who make many subwoofers, offer "SoundPath" isolating feet, $50 per 4.  Ugly, because they raise the M5 up and you can see them.  Silicone blocks are cheaper but also ugly.  A "stadium seating pad" for the pipe&slippers set will also do the trick, because it's typically sorbothane in a black nylon sleeve.  Bigger, but less tall so less obvious.  But even if you have one of those Mexican wicker hot-pad/trivet where it's mostly air but the reeds are set edge-wise, you can put that under your speaker and it will greatly reduce physical transmission while still looking "natural" like it belongs in your kitchen, dining room, and on your sideboard.]

StKong
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Answered (Verified) StKong replied on Tue, Oct 13 2020 5:28 AM
Verified by Steve
In addition to Trackbeo’s good response, I want to add that you should experiment with a folded piece of cloth like a kitchen towel under your M5.

If it does the trick, buy some foam padding material and cut it to shape. When placed under the M5 it is nearly invisible elevating the speaker ever so slightly and might be the simplest solution.

Obviously several factors are at play, but I find it is mostly down to weight and stabilisation.

From personal experience, the M5 can be tricky to deal with on lighter furniture and less sturdy surfaces causing all kinds of vibrations.

The unit simply isn’t sufficiently bottom-heavy.

Place a Beosound 1 in the same spot and the vibrations most often disappear.

Experimentation is key, and padding will get you a long way.

All Replies

trackbeo
Top 200 Contributor
409 Posts
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Verified by Steve

Steve:
at the lowest bass setting), it still vibrates many surrounding objects.
In addition to lowering the bass with the app, you can also affect it by choosing a position in Sound Settings.  Choose "Corner" even if it isn't -- because the app knows that corner placement reinforces bass, it will lower it more than "Wall" or "Free" positions.  Also in Sound Settings, you can set Loudness to "Off", just to prevent the bass boost at low volumes, though probably at low volumes you aren't having the problem?

But if you have already done this and also turned down the bass, then you are just "lucky": impressive, newly-to-you reproduced, lower frequencies are playing at resonances of your objects!  (1) If those "surrounding" objects contact the sideboard, of course move them off.  (2) The inverse square law works: move the speaker just a little farther from the objects, or vice versa.  Also repositioning will change how the speaker interacts with any "room modes" and you might get lucky to avoid reinforcement at precisely one frequency exciting your objects.  (3) What you asked: Yes, vibrations caused by physical transmission can be fixed with neoprene or sorbothane pads or feet underneath the speaker.  But this only helps with physical vibrations transmitted into the top surface of the sideboard, thru its legs, into the floor, and from there into the surrounding objects. (Also the surface of the sideboard can act like a soundboard of a musical instrument, but presumably you would have felt it and noticed if that were the problem.)  That's a long way to travel, and pretty unlikely for such a small speaker -- it's more likely that...  (4) The (normal) sound vibrations in the air are the cause, and you just happen to have some very finicky placement of metal blinds or whatever.  Again remember that wall or corner placement reinforces the bass so move the speaker out of such a position, and likewise, the bass will be at its loudest right against the wall or ceiling, so take your objects and move them off the walls, or add tiny felt bumpers so they don't buzz against the wallboard.

[Edit: Sorry, forgot to mention the usual vibration absorbers, because I think moving the speaker is your best option.  There are feet for just such a purpose: SVS, the people who make many subwoofers, offer "SoundPath" isolating feet, $50 per 4.  Ugly, because they raise the M5 up and you can see them.  Silicone blocks are cheaper but also ugly.  A "stadium seating pad" for the pipe&slippers set will also do the trick, because it's typically sorbothane in a black nylon sleeve.  Bigger, but less tall so less obvious.  But even if you have one of those Mexican wicker hot-pad/trivet where it's mostly air but the reeds are set edge-wise, you can put that under your speaker and it will greatly reduce physical transmission while still looking "natural" like it belongs in your kitchen, dining room, and on your sideboard.]

Steve
Not Ranked
Australia
4 Posts
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Bronze Member
Steve replied on Tue, Oct 13 2020 5:16 AM

thanks for your quick response, I will try the corner position setting and your suggestions of repositioning the M5 away from the wall.

There is little chance of any 'ugly' securing of objects (or the M5) getting past the boss.

 

Steve
Not Ranked
Australia
4 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Steve replied on Tue, Oct 13 2020 5:16 AM

thanks for your quick response, I will try the corner position setting and your suggestions of repositioning the M5 away from the wall.

There is little chance of any 'ugly' securing of objects (or the M5) getting past the boss.

 

StKong
Top 500 Contributor
Copenhagen
305 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Answered (Verified) StKong replied on Tue, Oct 13 2020 5:28 AM
Verified by Steve
In addition to Trackbeo’s good response, I want to add that you should experiment with a folded piece of cloth like a kitchen towel under your M5.

If it does the trick, buy some foam padding material and cut it to shape. When placed under the M5 it is nearly invisible elevating the speaker ever so slightly and might be the simplest solution.

Obviously several factors are at play, but I find it is mostly down to weight and stabilisation.

From personal experience, the M5 can be tricky to deal with on lighter furniture and less sturdy surfaces causing all kinds of vibrations.

The unit simply isn’t sufficiently bottom-heavy.

Place a Beosound 1 in the same spot and the vibrations most often disappear.

Experimentation is key, and padding will get you a long way.
ngnear
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211 Posts
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Bronze Member
ngnear replied on Tue, Oct 13 2020 11:20 AM
My M5 has been banned to the workshop and sits on the concrete floor. Even so I sometimes find it too “boomy”.

But it does depend on the type of music played I guess.

Steve
Not Ranked
Australia
4 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Steve replied on Tue, Oct 20 2020 4:47 AM

 

I have changed the settings to 'corner', moved it to a clearer location (without as many other items around it) and its definitely better. 

Thanks all for your help and suggestions.

 

Steve

 

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