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Pronto device and Beo6

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matador43
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matador43 posted on Sat, May 2 2020 10:55 PM

Nite nite everyone.

I came across and ad for a phillips pronto device full in box.

And wanted to check with you that this is the only hardware needed to learn "any" IR code to feed the Beo6?

I think I've understood that i will need some more software to convert formats: are this software available and is the conversion something easy done?

You have understand my goal: being able to use the Beo6 with any IR controllable device and being autonomous to program it as needed.

Did a quick search on this forum and the archived one but didn't find and clear answer and some intel about "protected codes" add confusion to me.

Thanks a lot. 

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Keith Saunders
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matador43:
But I believe most people including me want the opposite: not decode B&O streams but decode non B&O streams and encode them for use with Beo5/6 for those who still use it and believe in it.

Of course you don't want to decode B&O IR protocol, that was not the point. The point is that some IR protocols are much harder to decode and convert than others like, say the NEC protocol and I offered the B&O protocol as one of the hardest to decode for many reasons, then I offered a teaser as to why that was the case.

Regards Keith....

lawrencejmcook
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Keith Saunders:

Of course you don't want to decode B&O IR protocol, that was not the point. The point is that some IR protocols are much harder to decode and convert than others like, say the NEC protocol and I offered the B&O protocol as one of the hardest to decode for many reasons, then I offered a teaser as to why that was the case.

Regards Keith....

Ok, I’ll take the bait.

Why do B&O remote batteries last so long?

It it because they transmit at a higher frequency, therefore the emitters don’t need to be on for as long?

Lawrence
Keith Saunders
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You are correct.

The pulse width is very small (Nano seconds) where as most IR protocol codes like the popular NEC has pulse width of 1.12 milliseconds and a carrier frequency of 38 Khz.

The circuit only draws current from the battery when the emitting semiconductor switches on which is just a few nano seconds.

Also the carrier frequency only exists with the pulse, not the pause (semiconductor off situation)

Regards Keith....

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