Sign in   |  Join   |  Help

Will HomePod 'kill' BeoPlay?

rated by 0 users
Answered (Verified) This post has 1 verified answer | 205 Replies | 4 Followers

benoit
Top 150 Contributor
North East France
614 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
benoit posted on Tue, Jan 23 2018 6:23 PM

Hi,

With HomePod coming February 9th, will BeoPlay be that successful? Will they still manage to sell the non battery powered BeoPlay audio speakers (except A9) ? I think that even BeoSound 1 and 2 could highly suffer... I guess that soon we will learn if HomePod is far superior than BeoPlay (audio quality speaking) and maybe not far from BeoSounds for a much much lower price. And I don't speak about the wireless connectivity dropouts that happen...

What do you think?

Answered (Verified) Verified Answer

Mikipidia
Top 100 Contributor
857 Posts
OFFLINE
Gold Member
Verified by Alen
Wow, that almost read like b&o doesn’t yet know people leave reviews online. Besides that though, i still can’t imagine wanting to have our corporate overlords listening in on private conversations which they share with third parties. They listen to more than just hey siri/google/alexa, they pick up more info from regular conversations too for the purpouses of ad shaping. So with that in mind i’d rather have a somewhat “dumb” speaker or nothing at all Stick out tongue

New: Beolab 50's, Beolab 18's, Beovision eclipse, Beosound 9000 mk3, Beosound 1 Bronze edition, Beoplay M3.

Mikipedi4 on YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/c/mikipedi4

Old: Beolab 1's, beolab 2, beovision 10-46, overture 2300, beolab 8000's, beolab 4000's, beovision avant 32" etc. etc.

All Replies

expoman
Top 500 Contributor
165 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Home pod sales are lackluster.  Apple just cut orders to supplier.  I think B&O is safe for now.

 

Timmersch
Not Ranked
5 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

 

Lackluster for an Apple product..., I bet B&O would kill for the buzz and revenue HomePod has generated.

Also remember, a similar headline has appeared for almost every Apple product since the launch of the original iPhone.

Sandyb
Top 75 Contributor
1,435 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Sandyb replied on Fri, Apr 13 2018 10:20 AM

I think thats right i.e. dont underestimate Apple's ability to persevere with products and succeed to some degree.

That said, i was struck by how little prominence the HomePod had in my local Apple retail store.

They had one on display on the table, and its a big store.

And look at Apple Music subscriber growth / base...its ok at best, especially considering the install base of iOS devices. When they launched the subscription service, plenty speculated that they would catch Spotfy's paid base relatively quickly, but those expectations have not really been met as yet.

So not all Apple products and serves reach lift off. And i say this as an avowed Apple fan.

chartz
Top 25 Contributor
Burgundy, France
3,835 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
chartz replied on Fri, Apr 13 2018 10:21 AM
Hi,

To me, all this nonsense is so far from what real hi-fi has to offer. Just computer speakers, that will never ever replace my big boxes or panels, my all analogue setup, sorry.

The sound these devices produce - B&O or Apple alike - is just bad, not hi-fi.

Expensive kitchen radios, perhaps.

Jacques

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
5,337 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
vikinger replied on Fri, Apr 13 2018 11:12 AM

chartz:
Hi,

To me, all this nonsense is so far from what real hi-fi has to offer. Just computer speakers, that will never ever replace my big boxes or panels, my all analogue setup, sorry.

The sound these devices produce - B&O or Apple alike - is just bad, not hi-fi.

Expensive kitchen radios, perhaps.

Exactly my thoughts too. Manufacturers are brainwashing everyone to the idea that these little speakers, all around the home, with poor bass output, are somehow superior to true HiFi.

Graham

Duels
Top 50 Contributor
England
2,214 Posts
OFFLINE
Gold Member
Duels replied on Fri, Apr 13 2018 2:46 PM
vikinger:

Exactly my thoughts too. Manufacturers are brainwashing everyone to the idea that these little speakers, all around the home, with poor bass output, are somehow superior to true HiFi.

Graham

I think manufacturers are responding to a generation who value portability and accessibility over sitting in a sweet spot to listen to music.

Tastes have changed.
benoit
Top 150 Contributor
North East France
614 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
benoit replied on Wed, Apr 18 2018 8:19 PM

I have now a HomePod since some days and did a side by side listening with my BeoSound 2. Setting up was fluent and took less than 5 minutes. Just approach the iPhone and answer some few questions and done.

BS2 can get far louder but as I live in a condo I cannot push that much the level. I use the BS 2 at 35-55% when with the Homepod I'm between 40 and 60%. Max level of the HomePod is 2/3 of the BS2 I would say, but far too loud for my flat. (I refer to the sound cursor position in iTunes as I only Airplay music from my MacBook or iPad).

BS2 is a bit more clear sounding. Better mediums and trebles. Bass are sometimes a bit more heavy (boomy) on the HomePod (but I reduced them in the BS2 settings) and not as much as on my previous Beolit 15 which was very placement dependent.

To my ears I have to tell that I'm impressed with the feeling of having sometimes the voices placed in front of the instruments in some tracks. When I move around in my small living room (24 sqm) I think that the 360° is slightly better with the HomePod. None of them are stereo but the wideness of the scene seems better with the HomePod.

Design wise the BS2 is far better with perfect aluminium finish. HomePod is not bad but more discrete; it's very heavy for it's size, and well built as well.

If I had now to decide what to buy I couldn't anymore justify to spend 5 times more for a slightly better sounding device. HomePod is not bad at all. I'll see as the time passes if I feel the BS2...

 

Millemissen
Top 10 Contributor
Flensborg, Denmark
12,276 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Duels:

I think manufacturers are responding to a generation who value portability and accessibility over sitting in a sweet spot to listen to music.

Tastes have changed.

Exactly - and that was the reason for Bang & Olufsen to create the subbrand B&O Play.

Different kinds of taste and needs. 

Those who value mobility as their luxury, tent to buy Beoplay products - those who value durability and constancy as their luxury,

prefer the B&O products (or even the older B&O products).

Nowadays most of us mix....because we are versatile and live complexe lives.

However, there has been a general shift towards more flexibility and portability - and Bang & Olufsen as a company does well in serving both.

Actually they were pretty fast to understand this.

MM

There is a tv - and there is a BV.

Jeff
Top 25 Contributor
USA
3,464 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Wed, Apr 18 2018 11:45 PM

I'm afraid that for the modern B&O products durability and constancy are not the words that come to mind to describe the ownership experience. Older B&O, yes, as I sit here listening to my 20 plus year old BS9000 setup. Newer, not so much.

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
5,337 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Duels:
vikinger:

Exactly my thoughts too. Manufacturers are brainwashing everyone to the idea that these little speakers, all around the home, with poor bass output, are somehow superior to true HiFi.

Graham

I think manufacturers are responding to a generation who value portability and accessibility over sitting in a sweet spot to listen to music.

Tastes have changed.

Well my tastes haven't changed! With a proper system you can enjoy the sweet spot or listen to reflected sound all around the house.

The current trend is rather as if transistor radios in every room had been marketed as superior to Hi Fi in the 1960's.

Graham

Duels
Top 50 Contributor
England
2,214 Posts
OFFLINE
Gold Member
Duels replied on Thu, Apr 19 2018 12:07 PM
vikinger:

Well my tastes haven't changed! With a proper system you can enjoy the sweet spot or listen to reflected sound all around the house.

The current trend is rather as if transistor radios in every room had been marketed as superior to Hi Fi in the 1960's.

Graham

But it’s not all about you Graham with respect. And nobody is marketing it as superior to hifi as far as I’m aware. They are however selling the vast majority of people what they want.
vikinger
Top 25 Contributor
Vestri Kirkjubyr, UK
5,337 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

@ Duels,

It's probably a generational thing. Some remember moving up from transistor portables to true Hi Fi. 

Later generations are moving from ear buds to something very similar to the portable transistor radio, albeit with better streaming sources.

B&O have to follow the trend. Some of us choose not to.

Graham

Duels
Top 50 Contributor
England
2,214 Posts
OFFLINE
Gold Member
Duels replied on Thu, Apr 19 2018 1:49 PM
vikinger:

@ Duels,

It's probably a generational thing. Some remember moving up from transistor portables to true Hi Fi.

Later generations are moving from ear buds to something very similar to the portable transistor radio, albeit with better streaming sources.

B&O have to follow the trend. Some of us choose not to.

Graham

It is very much a generational thing Graham.

I personally use a main system (BS 5 with BL18s) for most home listening but supplemented by a wide variety of headphones/earbuds/Bluetooth devices.

Thanks to the flexibility of devices plus a chromecast attached to my BS5 I can listen to streamed music in the gym through buds, switch mid song to my car to travel home, walkthrough my front door and continue listening to the song on my main system in high quality, go upstairs and push the current music to an A1.

Thus represents a massive step forwards in listening pleasure as far as I am concerned. It is very much the best of both worlds.
poodleboy
Top 500 Contributor
243 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

vikinger:

@ Duels,

It's probably a generational thing. Some remember moving up from transistor portables to true Hi Fi. 

Later generations are moving from ear buds to something very similar to the portable transistor radio, albeit with better streaming sources.

B&O have to follow the trend. Some of us choose not to.

Graham

I believe I agree with everyone. As a child we had a small home stereo and I had my own transistor radio. In my 20s I had walkman and boom box as well as my own component system. Marriages pushed me into lifestyle products and media players with headsets, and now phones with bluetooth and streaming services. Most of that today is the same as it ever was.

Branding really started in the USA in the late 50's with television pushing annual changes in automobiles. In the mid 60s, American cars quit changing every year and companies started sharing components and divisions shared platforms, to the point where each company was selling several versions of nearly the same car to different customers and competing against themselves. Just one example, but maybe the biggest one. Of course, Sony, B&O, Marantz, McIntosh, etc, were VERY different from each other back then. 

What has changed? Only the media and the medium have really changed. Third world manufacturing and third party distribution has allowed companies and people to look at €300 and up as throwaway price. Isolating oneself from other people in public via headsets is even more popular in urban setting. Branding has not changed, and brand equity is no longer something that is technically explainable. Audio and video products are almost identical in looks and performance. And one particular company owns nearly all the entertainment brands for automotive. 

For me, that is why BeoPlay grows (to its limit) and B&O is on its last legs, sadly. Tarting up a TV is a probably €1000 proposition, at most, and everyone except B&O figured that out a long time ago (Give Loewe credit; their sinister stock manipulations and eventual buyout got them a credible ownership group). BeoPlay products will one day do all that Sonos does and might even interact correctly with Google. Then there will be no reason for it, either.

Jeff
Top 25 Contributor
USA
3,464 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Jeff replied on Thu, Apr 19 2018 9:53 PM

@poodleboy, sadly I think you're right. The home electronics market has changed markedly, and I doubt it ever will be what it was. The days of "real" stereos, or even full home theater setups, seems to be fading quickly. In many ways we are going backwards to the days of large, single radios/consoles instead of component stereos, only the modern replacements are smaller and smaller (aka homepods rather than big wooden console radios). B&O as a brand hasn't handled this well with the exception of Play, and Play has suffered from poor quality and a slapdash throw anything and everything against the wall to see what sticks product development approach. Whether Play survives depends on how long B&O can get away with this approach or if they finally get an integrated product portfolio approach together.

The traditional forte of B&O, beautifully designed, stunning, and well integrated home setups like the Beocenter 9500 and BS9000 have little relevance to the modern world. For some reason though companies like McIntosh and Marantz seem to be able to field full lineups of traditional components. Same for Yamaha, Denon, but many of the old names are either gone or have product lines a traditionalist would not recognize.

 

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

Page 11 of 14 (206 items) « First ... < Previous 9 10 11 12 13 Next > ... Last » | RSS
Beoworld Security Certificate

SSL