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How to connect A/V 7000 > Beomaster 5500

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davero53
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davero53 posted on Tue, Aug 1 2017 4:53 AM

Hello All, I'm new here and to Bang & Olufsen products. I have been given a Beomaster 5500, a Beocord 5500, & an A/V 7000 Surround. I'm looking for information as to how to connect the 7000 to the Beomaster 5500 and the Beocord 5500 and of course the front & rear speakers (I presume that one pair connects to the 7000 and the other to the 5500). I was also given a Y-connector that has a 4 pin DIN connector on one end and 2 RCA female connectors on the "Y" end. I also know that the IR receiver on the 5500 will need to be disabled which I also need information for.

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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solderon29
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I must have blinked and missed this one,as I don't remember an AV7000,and assumed that you meant AV9000,but hey ho,I've learned something new about the B&O range!!!

It seems that all your 'speakers (5)will need to be connected to the AV7000,as this will be the 'hub' of the system.I can only assume that you should then connect the AV7000 and BM5500 via their respective 'aux' ports,and the BC5500 to it's port on the BM5500.

I suspect that there will be some data collision between the two devices,as they weren't designed to integrate,but there may be someone on this site who has more info to impart?

The AV7000 seems to be a useful piece of kit,I hope that you can get it all working.

Nick

beojeff
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Be aware that the AV7000 must detect a video signal return to function correctly. To me, this seemed daft since TVs of that era rarely had a video output. You must split the video from the video source to go to the AV7000 video input as well as to the AV7000 video return from the TV. Also, the AV7000 horribly over-processes video to the point of over-saturated colors. It's best to bypass the AV7000 for the video signal. Probably a moot point since you likely want an HD video connection anyway.

beojeff
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P.S. A handy thing about the AV7000 is that it can serve as an amplifier for a passive center channel speaker. Also, it has a PUC. Most of the PUC is by now quite outdated. (It had laserdisc and CDV!) However, you might still be able to send on/off signals to some brands of TVs. For the Apple TV, you could program the Apple TV to respond to any signals from the old PUC.

solderon29
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I'm intrigued by this device,it seems a useful jobby.I'll try and get more info.

As beojeff states,you probably don't need to involve video sources,as they can be routed otherwise?

Nick

Jeff
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Jeff replied on Tue, Aug 1 2017 7:23 PM

beojeff:

Be aware that the AV7000 must detect a video signal return to function correctly. To me, this seemed daft since TVs of that era rarely had a video output. You must split the video from the video source to go to the AV7000 video input as well as to the AV7000 video return from the TV. Also, the AV7000 horribly over-processes video to the point of over-saturated colors. It's best to bypass the AV7000 for the video signal. Probably a moot point since you likely want an HD video connection anyway.

That's interesting, as when I had mine hooked up I never ran video to it and it seemed to function normally, you could select all the audio modes and they all worked (Dolby Surround (old school, no Dolby Digital or such), stereo 4, stereo, mono). Be aware that the Av7000 is not the best product B&O ever made, I felt audio performance was not as good using it on stereo as using the output of my BS9000 directly. When I removed it and went back to straight from the BS9000 it sounded quite a bit better to my ears. Unless you want old school Dolby Surround I'd not use the thing personally.

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

beojeff
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Jeff:

beojeff:

Be aware that the AV7000 must detect a video signal return to function correctly. To me, this seemed daft since TVs of that era rarely had a video output. You must split the video from the video source to go to the AV7000 video input as well as to the AV7000 video return from the TV. Also, the AV7000 horribly over-processes video to the point of over-saturated colors. It's best to bypass the AV7000 for the video signal. Probably a moot point since you likely want an HD video connection anyway.

That's interesting, as when I had mine hooked up I never ran video to it and it seemed to function normally, you could select all the audio modes and they all worked (Dolby Surround (old school, no Dolby Digital or such), stereo 4, stereo, mono). Be aware that the Av7000 is not the best product B&O ever made, I felt audio performance was not as good using it on stereo as using the output of my BS9000 directly. When I removed it and went back to straight from the BS9000 it sounded quite a bit better to my ears. Unless you want old school Dolby Surround I'd not use the thing personally.

My recollection is that when using it with the PUC to control some TVs, the PUC would cycle the video inputs on the TV until it reached the appropriate video return feedback.

Peter
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Peter replied on Tue, Aug 1 2017 7:53 PM

The AV7000 was really designed for the US market where B&O TVs had a very small presence and the AV7000 allowed integration of a B&O system with other makes of TV. Completely outdated now as it used an old Dolby Pro Logic standard and the list of devices supported by the PUC now will be mainly obsolete. There were a very few made for the European market which do the rounds from time to time and are clearly mainly of interest to the avid collector! The big disadvantage is losing the 2 way remote control in the Beosystem 7000. Fun device though - I think the user manual is on site.

Peter

beojeff
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Peter:

The AV7000 was really designed for the US market where B&O TVs had a very small presence and the AV7000 allowed integration of a B&O system with other makes of TV. Completely outdated now as it used an old Dolby Pro Logic standard and the list of devices supported by the PUC now will be mainly obsolete. There were a very few made for the European market which do the rounds from time to time and are clearly mainly of interest to the avid collector! The big disadvantage is losing the 2 way remote control in the Beosystem 7000. Fun device though - I think the user manual is on site.

You're quite right about it being around at a time when we didn't have B&O TVs in the US market. I remember when it was essential to have one to integrate B&O into a surround sound experience. I think the cost was something like $4K USD! It perfectly matched the BeoSystem 7000. However, you are right in that it removed the 2-way remote control. This is quite a heavy beast that has true B&O style with the brushed aluminum and the straight-forward red display. For its time, it was the most beautiful AV receiver around when compared to the standard large black plastic AV receivers from other manufacturers.

beojeff
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BTW, the AV7000 has its own built-in IR sensor, or you can attach the B&O external "hockey puck" IR sensor.

pjk561
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I greatly enjoyed my AV7000. Now gone. Mine had great sound. I had a Pioneer Laser Disc player connected to it. One of my discs was Strictly Ballroom. When Fran's father does the Paso Doble the heel clicks on the flooring sounded amazing. Its been only recent with a Beosystem 4 and Beolab 9s that I've been as impressed with the dynamics of sound in movies.

The AV7000 also has a separate IR mini stereo jack input for an external IR receiver. My AV7000 was in a closet but with the external IR receiver it received the remote commands.

Good luck with yours.

DMacri
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I have an AV7000 purchased as part of a BS6500 package deal. I didn't have any plans for it since it didn't have Dolby Pro Logic II at a minimum, and was a color mismatch to the white BS. Maybe I'll have to give it a try after all.

Dom

2x BeoSystem 3, BeoSystem 5000, BeoSystem 6500, 2x BeoMaster 7000, 2 pair of BeoLab Penta mk2, AV 7000, Beolab 4000, BeoSound 4000, Playmaker, BeoLab 2500, S-45, S-45.2, RL-140, CX-50, C-75, 3x CX-100, 3x MCL2 link rooms, 3x Beolab 2000, M3, P2, Earset, A8 earphones, A3, 2x 4001 relay, H3, H3 ANC, H6, 2014 Audi S5 with B&O sound, and ambio 

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