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Beogram 8000 on the way...

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etype76
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etype76 posted on Mon, Aug 24 2015 5:05 PM

Hello all, I'm new here and live in Japan,

 

My current turntable is a Thorens TD160 with a Rega arm which I restored and it looks great to say it was a spontaneous Ebay purchase. Now I've made another such purchase, a Beogram 8000. I have read enough to realise that these machines need plenty of TLC after 30+ years. 

My first question is basically, What is the first order of business when the turntable arrives? I understand that it is working and in "excellent condition" with a MMC20CL cartridge with the original protector. 

Beyond that, I don't know much else...

Any initial pointers appreciated. 

 

Thanks

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etype76
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Well, I got some music out of the 8000, just a few seconds before there seemed to be a loss of power. The display went blank (no dot in the display) and the arm froze, then power restored and the arm made its way back home. A second attempt to press play only resulted in the arm moving a cm towards the platter. The display flashes either 33.33 or just 33.

I've already ordered a new tachodisc and capacitor kit. I would also like to clean up the shaft and spindle of the tonearm and relubricate it. I am thinking that this player is definitely worth bringing into fully working condition again. I am trying to ask around for any electrical wizards, otherwise, I will have to get out my soldering iron. You'd think such a thing would be easy in Japan, not so! As for HiFi repair shops, they'll take one look at it and say 'dekimasen' (it can't be done.) I've been there before. 

chartz
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Perhaps the PSU block's contacts are erratic. Check that it is sitting properly in its housing, and also check the solder joints between the PSU and the main PCB. Those are often found cracked.

Jacques

etype76
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etype76 replied on Thu, Sep 10 2015 11:36 AM

Well, things may come to a halt here. I guess I overlooked the fact that the U.S. mains frequency is 60Hz (My 8000 is 120V @ 60Hz) and here in Tokyo it's 50Hz. I could uproot my family, change jobs and go to Osaka (60Hz) Unsure. I've searched around this forum and the net and I don't see any solutions. I notice in the service manual in the list of parts there are two shafts available, one for 50Hz and one for 60Hz, not sure how they differ or what that actually means. 

With the Thorens it was already 50Hz and I just shorted a resistor so could run it at 100V.  

etype76
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Since I've bought it, I'm going to get on with the restoration. I'll start by cleaning some of the dirt/grime from the chassis. It's surprisingly not too bad. Could someone help me and advise me on how to detach the transformer and main PCB? I can see that it is clipped into place, I'm not sure if the screws are also holding it. I obviously don't want to force anything.

Thanks!

 

 

 


chartz
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chartz replied on Sat, Sep 12 2015 6:48 AM

Just push it straight from below. It will come out from the top of the deck, underneath the right alu lid.

Jacques

etype76
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etype76 replied on Sun, Sep 13 2015 12:50 AM

Great thanks, That transformer is larger than I had assumed, but yeah it popped right outta the top! I've had a look at the PCB and it has all the original capacitors (W. Germany etc.) So I will wait for Martin's kit before doing anything else on the PCB. Interestingly, when I put the deck into the service position I noticed a small steel tubular object loose and stuck by the brass lever that allows access to the tacho-disc. I thought it looked quite important but couldn't imagine where it came from...until I lifted the tonearm assembly to one side. The upper shaft seemed to be missing that 'tube' on the right side, the left side has one. I'll bet someone attempted to do something and lost that piece. Anyway, I've cleaned the spindle and will apply some oil or silicon grease if I can get my hands on some. 

 

Just a question about the tonearm assembly, when I lifted it there was a white plastic bushing on the spindle, how do I make sure it is in the proper place when I drop the tonearm assembly back down? 

 

Cheers

 

etype76
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etype76 replied on Tue, Sep 15 2015 12:36 PM

Today, I installed the new tachodisc from Martin and began the recapping. I've managed to replace 6 capacitors so far, though I might leave the awkward looking 2200uf one till last. Will continue hopefully tomorrow if I get time. It definitely helps to take pics along the way, I had to refer to them a few times to check polarity and cap type. Martin's colour coded PCB copy is very useful. I have no testing equipment of any kind, just a soldering iron, solder pump, needle nose pliers, just the basics really. Should be interesting when I plug the 8000 in. I've got the board on a Nagaoka anti static record sleeve. The biggest trouble was from that black screw that holds the CPU metal casing. It simply wouldn't move, I went to the 100yen store and got a 30cm philips and it came right out with a bit of torque. I also reflowed the connectors to the transformer but will do most of the reflowing after recapping. When I'm done, I'd like to put up some pics and have you guys take a look and see if you can spot any glaring errors before I plug it in. 

 

 

etype76
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Slow progress today, I have replaced the capacitor in the CPU box. This one is very tricky, soldered on both sides of the board and perilously close the microprocessor. It is also confusing for someone who is simply 'removing parts and replacing them'; this one threw up a couple of issues. The capacitor seemed to have a red and blue wire going from it. it's such a confined space, it's hard to tell. Anyway, I desoldered these two wires to the new capacitor pins and then inserted the new cap and soldered it. Is this correct? or am I way off? I soldered the red wire to the + and blue to the -. The wires were leading from the speed variation module. 

first pic is as I found it, and then prior to insertion and then finished soldering on the board.

 

Thanks

 

 


etype76
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The new capacitor 47uf ready to go into C28

 

 


etype76
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C28, soldered into place


chartz
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chartz replied on Wed, Sep 16 2015 11:02 AM

Well done so far. Yes, the processor can requires meticulous attention. You did well!

Not going anywhere till the deck is up and running!

Jacques

etype76
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Cheers, it won't win any beauty contests but the joints seem stable. As you can see, Capacitor C28 will sit a bit high, I wanted it closer to the board, butI'd spent so long on recapping it I thought it would do. I also thought, If i need to back to it it will be easier to remove. 

 

Here's a pic of the tonearm spindle I took a few days ago, can anyone tell me what the plastic thing on the spindle is, and where it should go? I realise now that the tonearm assembly wasn't correctly in place because it simply pulled up with a gentle wiggle. I've now reattached the silver end to the shaft and clipped it in place. There was also a tiny brass tube floating around in the chassis too. 

 

 


chartz
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chartz replied on Wed, Sep 16 2015 1:28 PM
Oh, that!

It is the guide that allows the arm to move along the worm screw. It should be underneath the carriage. Do have a look at the service manual. There is a fork that should fit around it. You will have to take the rails out to remove the whole assembly, but my guess is that the fork might be broken. Normally you can't move the arm manually along the guides at all.

Jacques

etype76
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That could be a problem, though it did work and play when it first arrived and I haven't found any broken bits yet. Hmm, the service manual only shows me the exploded diagram and I can't quite make out the details. Here's a pic of the underside of the assembly. What are the forks made of? Metal, plastic? 

Cheers


sonavor
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etype76:

That could be a problem, though it did work and play when it first arrived and I haven't found any broken bits yet. Hmm, the service manual only shows me the exploded diagram and I can't quite make out the details. Here's a pic of the underside of the assembly. What are the forks made of? Metal, plastic? 

Cheers

It is a major problem because that is how the tonearm assembly works.
Here is a picture of the black, plastic rail guide attached to the white, threaded, plastic nut that travels the drive shaft to move the tonearm.


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