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What is this ?

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Dillen
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Dillen posted on Sun, Feb 19 2012 7:54 PM

OK then, let's see if we can create just a little more forum traffic.

Any idea what this is ?

Martin

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Medogsfat
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Verified by Dillen

I reckon it is a telephone exchange box or training device for one (possibly incomplete).

Read THIS part of quite an extensive article. There is an earlier mention of a 10 X 10 selector which also makes sense.

Chris.

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Peter
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Peter replied on Sun, Feb 19 2012 8:18 PM

Interesting - BOFA were the bit of B&O associated with cinema - however I wonder if this was some form of selection box for TV studios to change camera selection? Are there any other connections or is it just the thin slit?

 

Peter

tournedos
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Hmm... perhaps the slot is for a punch card? I still can't think of a use for it, though! Big Smile

--mika

Dillen
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Dillen replied on Sun, Feb 19 2012 8:59 PM

I think, you are both close.

The right side has a banana socket and a countersunk slotted brass screw right next to it

and it runs on batteries (battery lid unfortunately missing)

 

Martin

Dillen
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Dillen replied on Sun, Feb 19 2012 9:19 PM

Frankly, I have no idea myself what this is.

BOFA was, as Peter mentioned, a B&O division whose main products were
projectors, sound-, call- and intercom-systems for cinemas, schools, hospitals, factories
and other larger installations.
In the early 1970's Philips bought the remains of BOFA from B&O and the resulting company
was named Philips-BOFA. They only lasted a year or two and I'm not sure exactly what and
how many products they made.
This particular item is the only one I've seen with the Philips-BOFA name on it.

"Tutor SR-2" could suggest some kind of educational tool, some kind of test or practice equipment but
your guess is as good as mine.

Apparently, the thin slot at the back is for inserting a card of some sort, maybe a secret "result-card".
Pushing in the tiny black knob on the front will push the card back out so it can be removed.

The two clips along the top edge could hold a similar card over the hole grid, maybe a "task-card", presumably
covering some holes while leaving others free in a certain pattern to match the underlying "result card".

A lead could have been connected to the banana plug at the right side and it may have had a pointy
other end to connect through the upper card, down on to the lower card.
The brass screw could then be a "touch pin here to reset".
The green light, I would imagine, is a power lamp.
The switch with "1" and "2" and "0" I should think, is the power switch and at the same time
it selects a difficulty, pattern, speed or whatever.
The white lamps at the side, well, I haven't opened up the thing yet but I suppose they could indicate
how solving something correctly, in a particular order, on within a specific time frame goes.
Or maybe it's not even that complicated. Maybe just an indication of the making of a correct choice for
that particular row of the 10x10 holes as in a multiple choice test.
I think, I will try to open it tomorrow and have a look inside.

Martin

Peter
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Peter replied on Sun, Feb 19 2012 9:57 PM

I look forward to the results!

Peter

Step1
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Step1 replied on Sun, Feb 19 2012 11:16 PM

Get your cards out folks, we're playing BINGO Stick out tongue Big Smile

Olly

Søren Mexico
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This is a Philips Bingo card control maschine.

As you all remember Philips had their best times in the 1950s/60s. In these years they build retirement homes for Philips workers all over Europe, called BOFAs, BOrder Free Ancients. In the beginning of the 60s everything was registered with hole cards, and Philips introduced this one to check the Bingo card, this, after having had some turmoil on the border to mutiny, during Bingo games, in the BOFAs in Spain,Italy and Scotland.

  The Pic show the Central control panel, the players had a simple board with the 0-99 holes where they could insert their cards, then, with a simple tool, could make holes according to the called numbers.

The CCP was used:

1. When a number was drawn, a pin was inserted in the hole with the according number.

2. The banana plug was connected to an amplifier, the amplifier to a 200 watt monitor speaker, (ancients has hearing aids) and when the pin was inserted in the "number hole" the CCP announced very loud, the number.

3. When a player had one full row, the card was inserted in the CCP for control, and the CCP announced "the card is correct" or "please insert other card and try again"

4. When a player had a full card, the card was inserted in the CCP for control, and he CCP announced "this card is correct, we have a main prize winner" or, "this card is false, the card holder will be punished according to local BOFA rules".

The white lamps/buttons are for the "Number drawer" to keep track of games played.

The 0-1-2 switch is for off/on and when more than 10 games was played the switch was placed in the "2" position, (normally only on Sundays)

What a wonderful item Big SmileBeer

 

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

Cleviebaby
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Martin,

Building on Søren's idea, could you adapt it as the new random selector for the Prize draw?

Cleve 

Dillen
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Dillen replied on Mon, Feb 20 2012 2:58 PM

Great ideas, keep them coming !  Big Smile

Martin

Rich
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Rich replied on Mon, Feb 20 2012 9:36 PM

Looks like something out of the movie "The Parallax View."  I'm guessing an answer sheet reader, but punch card template might also work.

I missed having to take FORTRAN with punch cards at university by one year.


Step1
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Step1 replied on Tue, Feb 21 2012 10:28 AM

Martin the suspense is killing us!

I wonder if there was some sort of peg board that sat down over the holes with pins that sank, and made contact with something below depending on the card that had been inserted?Maybe it created punch cards and on contact confirmed with all lights lit....?

I thought it could be some sort of electronics set, where by the user put a 'diagram' on the clips, with holes where you would plug in small modules. A module would be a bridge that spanned so many holes and a component on that bridge.

There must be something important about a line by line basis horizontally, as opposed to vertically - as there are no lamps for vertical columns. Do these indicate power to columns...?

Either way, it was probably commissioned by Philips to keep the BOFA workers busy while they found a way to dissolve the company and get best bang for buck, as whatever this is the job can probably be accomplished using much easier techniques!

Olly

Dillen
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Dillen replied on Tue, Feb 21 2012 5:39 PM

Sorry, I have no idea myself, what this is.

But let's take a look inside.
Bottom off :

Martin

Step1
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Step1 replied on Tue, Feb 21 2012 6:22 PM

My mum use to attend leyline meetings and the like, and she use to bring some weird contraptions home but this makes some of that stuff look almost normal lol...

Looks like we have some sort of crude solenoid driven motor...?

Olly

Dillen
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Dillen replied on Tue, Feb 21 2012 7:10 PM

Yes, the solenoid will push one tooth forward at the gear wheel per activation.
It rotates a huge switch on the other side.

Top off:

On top of the switch is a cardboard circle with numbers 1-48.
A card can be stuck in from behind and it will apparently slide in the two wooden tracks and connect  to
the black socket near the front.

Martin

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