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B&O Turntables - Linear Tracking - Any Model

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cad55ken
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cad55ken posted on Thu, Jul 4 2013 7:28 PM

Could any of the linear tracking B&O turntables be instructed with the remote or touch controls to locate and play a specific track?

More specifically - could you select the turntable, then press 04, and PLAY and the laser would search over and find the fourth track and start to play there?

If this functionality was present - In which models?

 

Thanks

 

Ken

 

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Søren Hammer
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B&O never incorporated that technology, though it is technically possible to store your record collection on a modified Beogram 8000/8002.

The 8000-series is capable of complete remote control via Datalink to suitable Beomaster receivers - the later beomasters can even control arm movement with the remote.

Add a memory bank to the turntable which stores manually entered data (where the songs start), so record 45, song three would be typed 4503 (just like jukeboxes I guess.) The spindle that progresses the arm has a very accurate counter that monitors where the arm is on the record; this could be useful for such a system.

Vinyl records, cassettes, open reel, valve amplifiers and film photography.

tamtapir
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No, none of the Beogram turntables are capable to search and find a specific track.

/***

cad55ken
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I have just received a B&O 9500- 

is there a remote and linear tracking turntable I can attach that will at least let me raise/lower and move the tonearm back and forth?  

Thanks for time and replies.

Ken

MediaBobNY
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The matching Beogram 9500, along with a Beolink 1000 or Beo4 remote.

Søren Hammer
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MediaBobNY:

The matching Beogram 9500, along with a Beolink 1000 or Beo4 remote.

As well as Beogram 5005, 5500, 6500, 8000, 8002, 8500, 9000, 3000 and 3300 Smile

Vinyl records, cassettes, open reel, valve amplifiers and film photography.

MediaBobNY
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Søren Hammer:

As well as Beogram 5005, 5500, 6500, 8000, 8002, 8500, 9000, 3000 and 3300 Smile

If it's a 6500 don't plug it into the phono input - use Aux instead.  Smile

Jeff
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Jeff replied on Fri, Jul 5 2013 1:55 AM

The only turntable I ever saw that would automatically detect gaps between tracks and let you select by track number was an ADC one back in the 70's. It used a light beam and photo detector and had a row of buttons on the front, something like 1-10, you could push, as well as a skip forward and back control. I've only ever seen one of these in the flesh and that was over 30 years ago. 

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

Orava
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Orava replied on Fri, Jul 5 2013 10:38 AM

Jeff:

The only turntable I ever saw that would automatically detect gaps between tracks and let you select by track number was an ADC one back in the 70's. It used a light beam and photo detector and had a row of buttons on the front, something like 1-10, you could push, as well as a skip forward and back control. I've only ever seen one of these in the flesh and that was over 30 years ago. 

Some of Sharp and Mitsubishi players did that too.

 blah-blah and photographs as needed

AdamS
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AdamS replied on Fri, Jul 5 2013 1:38 PM

Jeff:

The only turntable I ever saw that would automatically detect gaps between tracks and let you select by track number was an ADC one back in the 70's. It used a light beam and photo detector and had a row of buttons on the front, something like 1-10, you could push, as well as a skip forward and back control. I've only ever seen one of these in the flesh and that was over 30 years ago. 

There were actually quite a few:

- ADC Accutrac 4000 (the one you mentioned)

- ADC Accutrac +6 (6 record autochange version of above)

- Akai AP-L95

- Technics SL-15, SL-6 and SL-Q6

- Aiwa LP-3000

- Optonica RP7100 and 9100

- JVC L-F71

And quite a few cheap Japanese decks found on the top of 1980s midi systems!

As mentioned, it is surprising that B&O never offered this facility. The second arm on the linear trackers beside the main arm would have been perfect for carrying the sensors and I'm sure the electronic technology was well within their abilities. Heck, the ADC decks were actually designed and made by BSR and if they could do it, anyone can!

tournedos
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AdamS:
As mentioned, it is surprising that B&O never offered this facility. The second arm on the linear trackers beside the main arm would have been perfect for carrying the sensors and I'm sure the electronic technology was well within their abilities.

I think it was a timing issue. Track detection would've been very difficult to implement with the discrete component circuitry that was used in the 4000/4002 series, and by the time the microprocessor controlled models came out, the detector arm didn't detect anything any more  - it was just ornamental.

Or, perhaps they just didn't think it was worthwhile to add a feature that wouldn't be 100% reliable anyway.

--mika

Jeff
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Jeff replied on Fri, Jul 5 2013 4:59 PM

Fascinating, I never knew there were that many tables that did this.

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

Step1
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Step1 replied on Sat, Jul 6 2013 12:44 AM

tournedos:

AdamS:
As mentioned, it is surprising that B&O never offered this facility. The second arm on the linear trackers beside the main arm would have been perfect for carrying the sensors and I'm sure the electronic technology was well within their abilities.

I think it was a timing issue. Track detection would've been very difficult to implement with the discrete component circuitry that was used in the 4000/4002 series, and by the time the microprocessor controlled models came out, the detector arm didn't detect anything any more  - it was just ornamental.

Or, perhaps they just didn't think it was worthwhile to add a feature that wouldn't be 100% reliable anyway.



I think B&O MUST have dabbled with the technology Mika, the accutrac was released in 75 / 76? This used two custom micros and hardly any discretes! I have one myself, I love it! All the more because I am a bit of a Columbo fan hehe...

I suspect the costs though, along with the fact that track detection is hit and miss with some records, although it works very very well with quite a few from my collection!

I love the feature, and might consider implementing it but the hard part is going to be the optics I think!

 

Olly

BeoTom
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Step1:

tournedos:

AdamS:
As mentioned, it is surprising that B&O never offered this facility. The second arm on the linear trackers beside the main arm would have been perfect for carrying the sensors and I'm sure the electronic technology was well within their abilities.

I think it was a timing issue. Track detection would've been very difficult to implement with the discrete component circuitry that was used in the 4000/4002 series, and by the time the microprocessor controlled models came out, the detector arm didn't detect anything any more  - it was just ornamental.

Or, perhaps they just didn't think it was worthwhile to add a feature that wouldn't be 100% reliable anyway.



I think B&O MUST have dabbled with the technology Mika, the accutrac was released in 75 / 76? This used two custom micros and hardly any discretes! I have one myself, I love it! All the more because I am a bit of a Columbo fan hehe...

I suspect the costs though, along with the fact that track detection is hit and miss with some records, although it works very very well with quite a few from my collection!

I love the feature, and might consider implementing it but the hard part is going to be the optics I think!

 

The Bye-Bye Sky High IQ Murder Case! That episode has always been one of my favorites because of that turntable.

I too, have wondered why B&O didn't implement that technology, but assumed it was maybe because the feature didn't seem to work consistently. Gap spacing between songs on records can be rather inconsistent.

bayerische
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Those where some cool turntables indeed. Yes - thumbs up

Too long to list.... 

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