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CD disc drive hub friction problem

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Dillen
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Dillen posted on Sat, Mar 27 2021 12:42 PM

I have a CD drive on the bench that has a hard time holding on to the disc at spin-up/down.
The disc vibrates heavily from the lack of friction. It makes a lot of noise and often the
disc is not accellarated fast enough for the drive to read it.
The drive hub has a circular streak of material on its perimeter, contacting the disc to generate friction.
It's still present but perhaps it has been worn to the point where there is no longer enough friction. 

What can be done? Did anyone solve a problem like this?

Martin

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Krolroger
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Suggested by Krolroger

Could you replace the perimeter material with a profile cut from self adhesive 1 or 1.5 mm neoprene foam?  Only comes in black.

Just a thought.

Simon

Dillen
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Dillen replied on Sat, Mar 27 2021 1:37 PM

I thought about something like that, the problem is that even half a mm thickness would be far to thick.

Martin

manfy
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manfy replied on Sat, Mar 27 2021 1:55 PM

I had a similar problem on a DVD drive in my PC once.

There's only 2 ways to eliminate slipping:

A) increase friction on the hub that's attached to the drive shaft
B) increase the clamping force by using a stronger magnet on the 'locking hub' (I'm not sure what's the formal name of that magnetic thinggy that presses the disc onto the drive hub)

There are upsides and downsides to either method. If the additional rubber on the drive hub is uneven, you may introduce a wobble and the laser won't be able to cope with that. Changing the magnet or adding tiny neodym magnets on the locking hub in an unbalanced manner can create a flutter and vibrations that exceed the lens's correction capabilities.

To verify that increased friction can solve the problem, I'd first use a very thin doublesided tape on the drive hub. Use a some cloth to turn the sticky surface of that tape into a merely tacky surface since we don't want the disc to stick to the hub; all we want is more friction. Test the drive. If all the problems are gone, you know which direction you should go.

Krolroger
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Suggested by Krolroger

Soudal make a transparent hybrid polymer ("Fix All" in the UK) for bonding applications.

A very thin bead of that around the perimeter, flatted down with a soapy solution, might provide the small amount of permanent tack you need.

 

Bill Briscoe
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Have you considered scuffing the existing Nextel layer up a bit? I would think that glueing a piece of course sand paper to a worthless CD and giving it a very light rotation around once might scuff the material to give it some more life?

Dillen
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Dillen replied on Sun, Mar 28 2021 8:26 AM

Thanks for all replies. Appreciated!

Martin

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