Sign in   |  Join   |  Help

Beolab 18 with Sonos Sub?

rated by 0 users
Answered (Not Verified) This post has 0 verified answers | 11 Replies | 2 Followers

hoogey
Not Ranked
8 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
hoogey posted on Fri, Jan 15 2021 1:13 PM

Anyone with experience of using Beolab 18 with Sonos Sub?

 

I just bought a pair of Beolab 18 speakers which are connected to Sonos Connect via RCA-cable (I only play music via Spotify and Sonos). I would however like some more bass... The obvious choice of sub would be the Beolab 19, but connecting a Sonos Sub would be both easier and cheaper.

 

Anyone with experience of this setup? Or can you see any problems or disadvantages with this setup?

All Replies

Steve at Sounds Heavenly
Top 50 Contributor
The cable workshop, Leics, UK
2,024 Posts
OFFLINE
Gold Member

Hi,

Welcome to Beoworld.  Any wired sub can easily be added to the system with a cable, but from memory I think the Sonos Sub is wireless only.  This means the only option would be to link it via the Sonos app, unfortunately I'm not sure if it will work with the Sonos Connect?

Kind regards, Steve.

Steve.

www.soundsheavenly.com

Founder of Sounds Heavenly Cables and Brand Ambassador for Bang & Olufsen

Sounds Heavenly are proud to sponsor BeoWorld!

hoogey
Not Ranked
8 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
hoogey replied on Fri, Jan 15 2021 4:43 PM

Did some more research and unfortunately I think you're right. Neither the Sonos Connect nor the Sonos Port seems to be able to link with the Sub alone. Strangely, the Sonos Amp can do this. But since Beo-speakers are active/powered you can't connect them to Sonos Amp.....

Is it possible to connect the Beolab 18 with non-Beo speakers? And how?

hoogey
Not Ranked
8 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
hoogey replied on Fri, Jan 15 2021 4:43 PM

Did some more research and unfortunately I think you're right. Neither the Sonos Connect nor the Sonos Port seems to be able to link with the Sub alone. Strangely, the Sonos Amp can do this. But since Beo-speakers are active/powered you can't connect them to Sonos Amp.....

Is it possible to connect the Beolab 18 with non-Beo speakers? And how?

Steve at Sounds Heavenly
Top 50 Contributor
The cable workshop, Leics, UK
2,024 Posts
OFFLINE
Gold Member

Hi,

You can link the Beolab speakers to a Sonos Amp by adding this converter to let you link the Sonos Sub wirelessly: https://soundsheavenly.com/line-in-connection/33-power-amplifier-to-beolab-line-in-attenuated-convertor-kit.html

However, this isn't ideal, I would personally go for a different sub instead.  Please let me know which one you choose and I can help you to connect this.

Kind regards, Steve.

Steve.

www.soundsheavenly.com

Founder of Sounds Heavenly Cables and Brand Ambassador for Bang & Olufsen

Sounds Heavenly are proud to sponsor BeoWorld!

hoogey
Not Ranked
8 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
hoogey replied on Fri, Jan 15 2021 4:55 PM

I'm open for suggestions... Didn't want a sub in the first place. The obvious option is of course the Beolab 19. But I could consider others as well...

trackbeo
Top 150 Contributor
542 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Maybe get simple RCA y-splitters for the output of the Sonos Connect, and send one side to the BeoLab 18s and the other side to "any" powered subwoofer, which you will hide away?   Most powered subs will filter out the high frequencies, but this method requires a sub with stereo line-level inputs, also a crossover frequency dial on the back, because you'll want to adjust its frequency range versus the Beolab 18's anyway.  You'll turn the volume up slightly in the app to compensate for the split.  (Decent but inexpensive subwoofers would be Rythmik, or SVS, or Hsu.  Don't remember which models have dual line-in instead of a single LFE jack, but plenty.  Just not the Sonos Sub (wireless only), nor the Beolab 19 (Powerlink, not line-in triggered IIRC)!) [Edit: Oops, "inexpensive" subwoofer depends on where you live: subwoofer shipping is costly and "free returns" aren't, if there's no in-country distributor.]

hoogey
Not Ranked
8 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
hoogey replied on Fri, Apr 16 2021 7:28 PM

Thanks for all your replies!

 

I tried connecting my Beolab 18 speakers to an active subwoofer  Anthony Gallo TR-1 like this:

   Sonos Connect   --[ RCA R+L ]-->   line-in SUBWOOFER line-out   --[ RCA ]-->   Beolab 18 (split RCA-cable: L to left speaker and R to right).

This works and gives me a good bass after adjusting cross-over fq.

But my problem is now an annoying buzz, most prominent when the speakers are not playing, but definately noticable with music playing as well. I guess it's more of a 60 Hz humm

Tried connecting all components to the same outlet / cord without effect.

A ground loop isolator makes the buzzing / humming worse.

Tried with more isolated subwoofer RCA-cables from subwoofer to speakers which reduced the buzz, but it's still there.

When I disconnected the subwoofer, and connected my the Sonos Connect directly to the Beolab 18 there still is a very low humm (you have to stand close to the speaker to notice). I don't know if it was there before I started this procedure...

 

To summarize:

1) Is my connection to the subwoofer correct? Please see the link above as I'm certainly not sure...

2) If correct connection - can I do anything else to reduce the humming? With the subwoofer connected the humming is too loud.

3) Without the subwoofer connected - is it normal with a barely noticeable buzz from the speakers when there is no music playing? It obviously disappears when the speakers are shut down.

 

Thanks in advance

trackbeo
Top 150 Contributor
542 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

1) Yes.

2) Likely something is poorly grounded in the audio path: This means the shielding of the audio cables (or wires internally), somewhere in the audio path, is cut or loose.  Yes, it is also possible that the shield is OK but you just happen to run the cable parallel to AC wires for some really big electrical equipment.

To test #2, purchase two little female-to-female RCA connectors, and take the sub out of the circuit without moving anything.  (Alternatively, unplugging the sub's AC power -- since its RCA connectors are simple pass-thru, no filters or anything -- should be the same test, unless you have some noisy piece of electrical equipment right near it.)  I.e. "differential diagnosis": is the hum with the cables, but without the sub, still there?

3) I would say "no that's not normal" but I don't own 18s to know how immune they are to electrical noise.  The easiest way to know for sure is to go to your dealer on a quiet afternoon and listen to theirs.  Despite having spent a lot of time on setup, theirs will be an electrically-noisy environment with all the gear, so whatever they have for noise should be the upper limit on what you should expect at home.

To test #3, purchase two little RCA "grounding" or "shorting" plugs (or make your own) which are just a wire from the signal pin to the shield.  Plug 'em in to the 18s -- after triggering the line-in power-on of course -- and see if the little buzz goes away.  Again, differential diagnosis: is it the speakers (their amp board, actually) or the cables (or their source) causing it?

P.S.  That Gallo sub has the lowest W.A.F. of any I have ever seen -- even worse than the cylindrical columns from SVS! Big Smile So I can see why you might have run extra-long cables to keep it well out of the way!  Longer cables pick up more noise, of course, if there is any in the first place.  But if the Gallo sub is responsible for the hum (#2), it is possible that the internal wires are un-shielded and its power supply transformer is radiating right beside them; this would be an engineering failure.  More likely would be a manufacturing glitch; connections to the outside world are still done by hand many places.  An easy fix is to put Y-connectors right at the L/R RCA jacks on the Sonos, and run *separate* cables to the sub and to the 18s, not using the Gallo pass-thru jacks.  That doesn't prevent radiating the 60 Hz hum back down the cable, all the way out to the speakers, but so much noise would have to be a truly egregious fault (and cause for a return).

hoogey
Not Ranked
8 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
hoogey replied on Wed, Apr 21 2021 8:39 PM

Thank you for your thorough answer. Will try this as soon as I can. 

Are there any benefits of letting the signal pass through the subwoofer - or disadvantages using a Y-cable directly from Sonos? 

According to the Gallo manual there seems to be different ways of connecting the speakers with filters at certain frequencies, depending on which connection you use (RCA vs “loose wires”) but I don’t really get it... am I getting it wrong? 

 

PS I kind of like my Gallo Sub. Actually find the Beolab 19 strange looking... But it’s all a matter of taste :) 

hoogey
Not Ranked
8 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
hoogey replied on Fri, Apr 23 2021 11:27 AM

Realised the link to the manual was wrong... this is actually the subwoofer I have. Different looking connections at the rear (but otherwise the same WAF ;-)

 

https://galloacoustics.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/tr-1-manual.pdf

trackbeo
Top 150 Contributor
542 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

hoogey:
Are there any benefits of letting the signal pass through the subwoofer - or disadvantages using a Y-cable directly from Sonos?
Gallo's manuals (both) imply that the sub's line-level inputs are directly connected to its line-level outputs, with no filtering, buffering, or amplification.  But shorter cables are always better.  If the Connect is right beside the 18s, use a Y -- don't send a long cable off to the sub in the corner of the room and bring another long cable back!  If the Connect is right beside the sub, you might as well use the sub's pass-thru -- except subject to it maybe being the source of the hum, see the previous response/tests!

hoogey:
According to the Gallo manual there seems to be different ways of connecting the speakers with filters at certain frequencies, depending on which connection you use (RCA vs “loose wires”) but I don’t really get it... am I getting it wrong?
Filters to the speakers "downstream" from the sub are only provided on the speaker-level connections, not line-level connections (see above).  But you don't care: The 18's are perfectly capable of filtering away frequencies that are too low for them to reproduce, so sending them the full frequency range is fine.  Because you have two speakers reproducing at least some of the same low frequencies -- even if you adjust the sub's frequency cutoff, it rolls off, it isn't perfect -- you may also need to use the "Phase" control on the sub, to match them.  It will be really really obvious if they are out of phase and canceling each other out vs. in phase and reinforcing each other.  You will have no trouble setting that control properly!

The 4-way dance of sub volume, sub crossover (highest) frequency, phase matching, and moving the sub around to minimize the room's bass boom frequencies, will give you hours of "enjoyment" to optimize.  But let's get rid of the hum first...

 

Page 1 of 1 (12 items) | RSS
Beoworld Security Certificate

SSL