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GRAMMAR is important

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Søren Mexico
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Søren Mexico posted on Thu, Jan 24 2013 11:43 PM

As we are a lot of "outlanders" here on the foum and the main language is English, here an explanation why Grammar  is important

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tournedos
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chartz:
Oh, I was talking about French forums only! I think the worst are medical and car and bike forums.

OK Big Smile

Well it isn't any better on Finnish forums. I've been on Internet discussions since the 1980s. Back then, all the participants were more or less academic, and the worst offenders were always doing it on purpose to troll. Nowadays, the Interwebs are full of people that may never have read an entire book in their life. The kids (which is nowadays anybody under 30) don't even think that anybody should care about how to write proper language. These issues may concentrate on the car, bike and similar tech forums, because they often attract those that swapped school books for a wrench when they were 15 - or are still 15. Now that I've started, anybody else want to get offended? I could say something about hockey fans as well... Stick out tongue

(Oh yeah, another issue that makes me immediately click on "back" is "ur" and "coz"...)

--mika

Rich
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Rich replied on Sun, Jan 27 2013 5:27 PM

tournedos:

I could say something about hockey fans as well

Just for that, I am no longer a Valtteri Filppula fan.


Ƨcɑɽɑɱɑnɡɑ
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I'd like to think that my vocabulary, grammar, etc... had become vastly more international since joining BW.

Then I recoiled mating Tulac's acquiesssence.

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vikinger
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ɓʋɾɑɳɫɘɮ:

I'd like to think that my vocabulary, grammar, etc... had become vastly more international since joining BW.

Then I recoiled mating Tulac's acquiesssence.

Just as well you recoiled from it! Whistle

Jeff
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Jeff replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 3:29 PM

tournedos:

chartz:
Oh, I was talking about French forums only! I think the worst are medical and car and bike forums.

OK Big Smile

Well it isn't any better on Finnish forums. I've been on Internet discussions since the 1980s. Back then, all the participants were more or less academic, and the worst offenders were always doing it on purpose to troll. Nowadays, the Interwebs are full of people that may never have read an entire book in their life. The kids (which is nowadays anybody under 30) don't even think that anybody should care about how to write proper language. These issues may concentrate on the car, bike and similar tech forums, because they often attract those that swapped school books for a wrench when they were 15 - or are still 15. Now that I've started, anybody else want to get offended? I could say something about hockey fans as well... Stick out tongue

(Oh yeah, another issue that makes me immediately click on "back" is "ur" and "coz"...)

I hear you brother! I'm old enough my first online experience was ARPAnet! Back then, and in the early days of the Internet/Usenet you had to be in academia or a DoD type to get online, and had to know how to use such arcane things as VI or TIN, which sure acted as an idiot filter. Back then the flame wars were amazing, slugfests ripe with wit and dripping with intelligent, witty sarcasm and obscure references. Now sadly it seems F U is considered the height of online discourse. 

Jeff

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Rich
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Rich replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 3:46 PM

Is this where I rejoin the conversation by noting the time I hosted a BBS with an IBM AT clone that was decked out with two 28.8k internal modems and a 40 MB hard drive?


Millemissen
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@Rich

This is not only about GRAMMAR any longer - it is simply more about 'understanding what the heck you are writing' Crying

Grrr! Millemissen

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Rich
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Rich replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 6:19 PM

Millemissen:

@Rich

This is not only about GRAMMAR any longer - it is simply more about 'understanding what the heck you are writing' Crying

Grrr! Millemissen

Is this where I say, "I would of thought you could care less."


Viktor
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Viktor replied on Sun, Feb 10 2013 2:53 AM

Im from sweden and our written language has a few differences compared to our spoken language, even more so with the sms/internet spelling. Maybe its because sweden (and scandinavia in general) is pretty interested in, and good at learning foreign languages, that I feel as long as you can make people understand what you are trying to say its all good. Or maybe its becaus people from sweden, denmark, norway and parts of finland can all understand each others languages without training, with just a few misinterpretations, that I think grammar sometimes should be secondary to understanding. However I dont see any reason people should have a difficult time spelling words in their own language. Just a couple of years ago I saw a poster for one of the political candidates in my city using "spoken spelling" instead of "written spelling". something like writing "a apple" instead of "an apple", "de" versus "dom" for the swedes on this forum (both are pronounced "dom" but "de" is the written spelling, or "dem" in some cases) .

 

Anyway, when communicating online, or anytime I use english, I have two rules that I follow: 

1. Dont use dubble negative. Example: dont say nothing. Technicaly that would mean you should say something but people take it as being quiet.

2. There is a differance between shortening "they are" and something belonging to them

Anyone got any more rules I should add? I know I havent used the ' sign but its just too much work on the ipad touchscreen. 

Viktor
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Viktor replied on Sun, Feb 10 2013 3:01 AM

Ps. Speaking of languages, I have recently been hooked on P.G. Wodehouse novels. He often uses the greeting frase "Hullo" instead of "hello", is there anyone here from the UK that could explain the differance to me? Or the origin of this version of the greeting?

Electrified
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Viktor:

Ps. Speaking of languages, I have recently been hooked on P.G. Wodehouse novels. He often uses the greeting frase "Hullo" instead of "hello", is there anyone here from the UK that could explain the differance to me? Or the origin of this version of the greeting?

 

WikiPedia:

Hullo

Hello may be derived from hullo, which the American Merriam-Webster dictionary describes as a "chiefly British variant of hello,"[13] and which was originally used as an exclamation to call attention, an expression of surprise, or a greeting. Hullo is found in publications as early as 1803.[14] The word hullo is still in use, with the meaning hello

From here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hello#Hullo

 

elephant
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elephant replied on Sun, Feb 10 2013 10:28 AM
Electrified:

From here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hello#Hullo

oh I love it

The American variation is seen as primary

LOL

BeoNut since '75

Jeff
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Jeff replied on Sun, Feb 10 2013 3:58 PM

I do so love Wodehouse, a truly witty and clever author who captures the feeling of the age with graceful comedy. There was a British series we got over here in the US on PBS called "Wodehouse Playhouse" that was a delight.

The bugaboo about there, their, and they're...there's Big Smile three of them!

Jeff

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vikinger
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Jeff:

I do so love Wodehouse, a truly witty and clever author who captures the feeling of the age with graceful comedy. There was a British series we got over here in the US on PBS called "Wodehouse Playhouse" that was a delight.

The bugaboo about there, their, and they're...there's Big Smile three of them!

Wodehouse based 'Blandings' is currently showing on UK BBC on Sunday evenings.

As for the Hullo / Hello debate I don't think I've ever encountered the use of Hullo other than very occasionally in written English. Then again, I'm in NW England, not far from Liverpool, which has always has a leaning towards all things American!

Graham

DMacri
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DMacri replied on Sun, Feb 17 2013 3:28 PM
"Hullo" is probably just a more accurate representation of how many Americans are mangling pronunciation. Just like "I dunno" instead of "I don't know".

Dom

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