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Engineering the immersive sound experience

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Barry Santini
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Barry Santini Posted: Mon, Aug 10 2020 11:56 AM
Take a few minutes to read this story about 2L:

https://immersiveaudioalbum.com/2020/06/qa-with-morten-lindberg-2020-grammy-winner/

Maybe Geoff might chime in and say how B&O aligns or differs and why.
lawrencejmcook
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Fascinating. I like the “map one mic to one speaker” philosophy. I’ll have to explore their catalogue.

Thanks for sharing, Barry.

Lawrence
Geoff Martin
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Howdy,

I'm not sure that there's much for me to say about this article from B&O's perspective... 

Speaking as a former recording engineer, there are some things that I firmly agree with - most notably:

  • that there's a "translation" between headphones and loudspeakers. You can learn the difference - but you always have to rememver that they're different
  • A recording is not intended to re-create a live experience. I say this every time we have someone visiting B&O... When you watch Star Wars, you should feel like you're in the Millenium Falcon - you're watching a story. Music recordings are the same. (Maybe that's the B&O perspective - we never try to make systems that make you think "you are there" or "they are here". We just try to make systems that faithfully reproduce what the recording and the mastering engineers heard when they did the recording.)

The one-mic-per-loudspeaker philosophy is common. Pentatone does this for multichannel well. MANY 2.0 classical recordings are done this way - especially the smaller-label ones. It puts all the work up-front, because you can't "fix it in the mix" later.  This technique can be done well (Morten does a good job!) and it can be done very poorly as well - so it's not a solution, it's "just" a philosophy.

If you're either interested in the math and psychoacoustics behind this philosophy of recording for multichannel, or you have trouble sleeping, you might find that this paper helps...

Cheers
-geoff

 

Geoff Martin
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Sorry... big error in there... That should have read

"When you watch Star Wars, you should NOT feel like you're in the Millenium Falcon - you're watching a story."

I type faster than I can think... And I don't type very fast...

-g

Millemissen
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No problem, Geoff - just blame it on the hot summer weather  ;-)

There is a tv - and there is a BV.

Jaffrey2230
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Ah. when I read your initial response, I was a little confused. I agree with the B&O approach. I want to hear what the artist intended vs. trying to create a live performance.

B&O products I use by zones in my home: 

Platform: Apple Home  (iOS/Mac, with Google Wi-fi (3x mesh), 100% streaming audio (Sirius XM, Apple Music, TuneIn Radio); TV/Office: Beolab 8002 (Red) + Beolab 2 [Sony OLED (65 inch), Apple TV 4K]; Living: Beoplay A9 (MK2), Bedroom: Beolab 6000 (Red) + Beolab 11 + Beosound Core w/ Essence Remote [LG UST Projector directly to wall (85 inch), Apple TV 4K]; Guest Rooms: Apple HomePod x 2  Dining: Beoplay M5 [previously Beosound Stage] ; Portable in-house: Beosound 1 with dock; Travel/bluetooth: Beoplay P6, BeoPlay H9 (3rd Gen) [H95 any day now!], Apple AirPod Pro. 

 

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