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Vintage speaker choice

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Jagarbiffen
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Jagarbiffen posted on Wed, Jan 22 2020 3:07 PM

New to this forum but I got an idea to setup some vintage speakers and all based on a nostalgic memory.

I remember walking in to the local hifi store where I heard the warm sound of some cool looking speakers. This was probably in the early 90s. So a couple of weeks ago I rememberd this and started the google investigation. I do beleive the speakers must have been the RL140, RL7000, RL60.2.No idea what the setup was outside of this.

From what I can recall it was a warm and very inviting sound with a good base tone to it.

 

So back to this day my idea is to get a hold of some of these cool looking speakers but wich ones should I get? And since we are now in the 2020s what type of receiver is resonable? I had an idea about getting the RL140s and connect them to a NAD748 and maybe add a subwoofer of some sort. The setup would then drive bluetooth, tv, dvd, cd and phono.

 

Does it sound like a good plan? Or is it dog poop? Is the RL140s the right choice?

Please provide all your ideas and inputs!

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Peter
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Peter replied on Wed, Jan 22 2020 7:25 PM

The RL140 is a very big speaker! I had a few pairs of RL60.2s and they were not small! They were designed to sound their best with Japanese amplifiers and are warm sounding with an extended bass. This can be altered considerably by using the stands which is how I prefer them. The cross overs usually need attention but these are easily reached and they are quite dramatic speakers though are made of resin rather than the wood of the more conventional earlier speakers. If you get the RL140s, I doubt you will need a sub-woofer!

Peter

Jagarbiffen
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Thank you for your input!

 

Do you know how the 60.2 compare to the RL140s?

 

Any ideal if any of the japanese are better than the other for this project?

Stereomensch
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I do own the redline 7000 speakers. I think they're identicial with the redline 140 speakers.

I use them with a Beomaster 6500. They are nice, very neutral, maybe a bit to neutral.

The speakers are very sensitive to room placement. I use the stands.

Many say they work best without the stand. The sound is placed on the ground fuller.

 

I really don't know where these rumours about japanese amplifiers came from?

The redline speakers were the last generation of passive speakers from B&O.

They replaced the famous uniphase speakers.

Stereomensch
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If you want to buy redline speakers, watch out for the surroundings. They're made of foam and after 20 years detoriated.

 

The repair is not to difficult :)

you can get them at this shop:

https://www.speakerrepairshop.nl/de/gummi-sicken/bang-olufsen/gummi-sicke-fur-bang-olufsen-beovox-rl7000-tieftoner/a-952-10000014

Jagarbiffen
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Super! Thanks!

Not sure about the difficulty level though Big Smile

Are there any other weak components to look out for? 

Andrew
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Andrew replied on Mon, Jan 27 2020 5:00 PM

Depending on how much room you have S45-2, S60 or S75 are a good choice. I am driving M100-2's with a modern Yamaha receiver and they sound superb.

I had RL60's and drove those with a Harmon Kardon amp for years and was very happy with the sound - from memory they benefit from having the stands or they are difficult to place. 

I think the RL60's had both Din and normal speaker wire connections and may have been 8 ohm (not sure) but that might be why people thought they could be driven by Japanese amplifiers. Although that wouldn't have made any difference.

Peter
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Peter replied on Mon, Jan 27 2020 7:07 PM

I was told at the time they came out that they were designed to broaden the use of B&O speakers and their sound characteristics were supposed to match other manufacturers' amplifier lines. I believe that originally they were going to run parallel to the more traditional line. However they clearly work well with any amplifier though I find them bass heavy when not on stands. I have had a couple of pairs and gave them away. But as I have also given away a number of traditional speakers too, this is not meant to be dismissive. I only have two sets of passive B&O speakers now; M100.2s and a pair of S45.2s - I only use the M100s. (I do have 2500s but they are more of an ornament!)

Peter

Andrew
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Andrew replied on Tue, Jan 28 2020 7:26 AM

Hi Peter - yes that would make sense - agree that they were bass heavy if put on an angle on the floor (as in one of the magazines!) At the time they totally suited Dance/Club type music in the 90's when I had them. I replaced some 5700's with RL60's as I wanted a more modern look and don't recall noticing any degradation so they must have been good. Wish I'd kept the 5700s though.

 

Stereomensch
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There is a big difference between the first and the last generation of the Redline 6000 speakers.

The first generation had passive membrans and the latter ones featured bass reflex ports.

These passive membrans are difficult to repair. Takes a lot of time :(

The Redline 140 and 7000 were only made with ports.

If you have the choice, go for the big ones.

May be someone can give you an idea how different the redline 6000 and 7000 sound?

Never compared them side by side....

Jagarbiffen
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So I actually landed a couple of RL 7000s today for about 60 euros. Just waiting for them to be delivered... Now I need to find a receiver to match Smile

Dillen
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If you like the warm sound, I can't help thinking about Beovox Penta.
Quite different design but some of the most beautiful speakers ever designed in my opinion, and they sound warm, pleasant and not wearing on the ears.
RL140 or RL7000 are the best alternatives, though a bit bass heavy depending on placement.

Pentas will need attention to the midrange drivers (four in each tower), RL140s will need attention to the woofers (two in each cabinet).
All will need fresh capacitors to the crossover filters (readymade kits are available - PM or email me) - and that includes RL7000.
RL60.2 well... yes and no. They are good speakers in their own right, but I think you want to go a little further than average,
Beovox S45 and S45.2 (Types 6302 and 6312 only) are surprisingly good and balanced speakers for their size and age, - but not quite as powerful as
RL140s and Pentas.

Martin

Stereomensch
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RL140 or RL7000 are the best alternatives, though a bit bass heavy depending on placement.

I Use them with stands and don't think they're bass heavy. 38 liters with two 16,5 woofers is not a bass heavy contruction.

They're too big to be used only on props...

Stereomensch
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Do you use the redlines with loudness or without?

It's quite a big difference, isn't it...

It depends how loud the Beomaster is

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