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CX100 replacement drives

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Tjntjn
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Tjntjn posted on Thu, Aug 30 2012 2:11 PM

Hi

 

Does anybody know where to get (cheap) replacement drives for the CX100 speakers?

 

Regards

Thorben

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Dillen
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Dillen replied on Thu, Aug 30 2012 2:15 PM

The CX100 drivers, as most other speaker drivers used by B&O, are custom produced so the answers are:

1. You don't find cheap replacements anywhere. They don't exist.
2. You can still buy new original drivers from B&O but they are not particularly cheap.
3. You can have your drivers prof. repaired, that will be the cheapest method.

4. A membership grade of minimum silver is required to place sales/wanted ads so this post will
be deleted shortly.

Martin

Steffen
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And I must add:

It is possible to find cheap replacement drivers that fits in size...Sadly a lot of people has done this over the years...Crying

Don't do this at home kids... No - thumbs down  You ruin the sound of the speakers...

As Dillen said -buy originals or get the old ones refoamed.

Nick
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Nick replied on Tue, Sep 4 2012 7:30 AM

I refoamed my cx50's and it was simple to do, so give it a go

Cheers Nick

Dave Farr
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I've just refoamed a pair of CX100's and 50's at the weekend.  The first I've done and it was much easier than I thought - messy getting the old foam and glue off but it has been well worth it.  They play really clearly and sound great now.  Go for it.

Dave.

Leslie
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Leslie replied on Tue, Sep 4 2012 11:01 PM

Quite easy isn't it?

Did you do the shimming as well?

Brengen & Ophalen

Søren Mexico
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Leslie:

Quite easy isn't it?

Did you do the shimming as well?

Of course he shimmed, its the only way to do it properlyLaughing

 

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

Leslie
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Hush Soren, let the guy speakStick out tongue

Brengen & Ophalen

Dave Farr
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Nick said it was 'simple, I said it was 'easier than I thought'.  Now, without really wanting to get into huge discussions and potential disagreements about the necessity of shimming - NO, I didn't shim.

For every professional speaker repair expert who says shimming is vital, there is another who says that it is not necessary - UNLESS, there is obvious physical damage to the cone, voice coil, spider.  Normally, the 'rub method' should suffice - which is the method I used and have had 100% success.  I have gradually cranked up the volume from my Beocenter 9000and played very bass heavy music with no indication of distortion/rubbing so am satisfied with the performance of my refoamed speakers.  I haven' got equipment to generate 10 hertz signals to pre-test them.so rely on my hearing and fingertip sensitivity alone.

For some, this won't be enough and they may prefer the almost guaranteed shimming method.  If the foams are stretched during fitting - this isn't guaranteed either according to some refoamers once the shims are removed. It's a matter of personal choice, time availability, aptitude of the person refoaming or indeed the absolute necessity of shimming.

Yesterday I read about a professional speaker repair guy who refoamed a speaker and there was a slight rub once the glue had set-up (noticeable when played).  He simply turned the speaker in the cabinet by 180 degrees and the speaker has performed flawlessly for over 18 years. 

For the next refoming I do, I may well shim to see how much more work is involved and to see if I can tell any differences in performance - but with my 53 year old hearing, I doubt it now!

Dave.

tournedos
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Dave Farr:
For every professional speaker repair expert who says shimming is vital, there is another who says that it is not necessary - UNLESS, there is obvious physical damage to the cone, voice coil, spider.  Normally, the 'rub method' should suffice - which is the method I used and have had 100% success.

I guess it has most to do with what kind of drivers you are refoaming. The CX series is a popular entry level job, because they are always broken and new drivers usually cost more than the speakers did. They are also small and have forgivingly large tolerances, so they aren't that difficult to get done. Same with Penta midranges. This may create a false sense of confidence and lead to disappointment once you try to do some bigger bass drivers from say, M and S series or RL140 without shimming.

The big issue is finding good quality foams. After refoaming, my CX100 and CX50 pairs sounded quite unimpressive, which is why they didn't end up in regular use.

--mika

Søren Mexico
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tournedos:
This may create a false sense of confidence and lead to disappointment once you try to do some bigger bass drivers from say, M and S series or RL140 without shimming.

We have had this discussion several times (and I love it). Before my first attempts to refoam I did my homework, reading up on driver constructions and materials, I also took into consideration that we are mostly refoaming drivers of 20 + years.

One of my concerns is this, if a speaker starts sounding bad, many people dont bother to find failures, they just buy a new one and put the old one in the garbage, or (lucky for us) leave it in the attic or the garage, after some years someone find it or the owner cleans up his spaces and put it up for sale.

What happens, during this time, to the drivers with a bad surround, stored in a bad environment.

Here a drawing of a driver, the gap in the voice coil is shown too big, in reality it is (for some driver types) only 2 to 3 strands of hair (depending on your hair type, mine is 0.04 Mm)

This is the way you will see, and think about, the driver when you are going to fit a new surround. TOTALLY WRONG, see next pic.

This is the way you will have to imagine your driver, the way its placed in the cabinet and stored

Without the surround there is no support for the top of the cone, the only thing that gives it some support is the spider. Let the speaker be stored for some years without use, what happens ?? The down force from the cone will force the spider in the direction of the blue arrows, there is no way to avoid it, Its the law of nature, Newton and Einstein will confirm this. The ambient where the speaker is stored will help a lot to deform the spider, hot, cold, humid, dry, not to speak of air pollution from when you wash your car, paint or clean the floor in your garage.

THIS IS ONE ( 1 ) OF THE REASONS FOR SHIMMING. 

Nearly all speaker repairers recommend some "play in time" for a repaired driver, the new surround has to settle they say, not right, the spider will after a long down time deform and get stiff, the play in time is more for the spider than anything else, it take some time before it gets flexible and comes back to its natural position again (if ever). This is maybe the reason why Mika doesn't like his CXs

Shimming gives you 10 min. extra job per driver and it is easy, so why not do it.

Now tell me if I'm wrongLaughing

 

 

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

tournedos
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Søren Mexico:
Now tell me if I'm wrongLaughing

Yes: it's millimeters, not megameters Big Smile

My CXs came straight out of use (most of the original surrounds were still in one piece, although barely) and the problem was definitely with the replacement surrounds. They were so hard material that I remember wondering how they ever could work the same way as the originals. I guess I should've aborted the mission at that point. Frankly I'm not a big fan of CXs in general, they sound somehow irritating to me - which is why I've loaned them out Big Smile

--mika

Søren Mexico
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tournedos:
Yes: it's millimeters, not megameters Big Smile

Mm. is the correct way in MexicoBig Smile

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

Agent00soul
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It takes much more than 10 minutes to carefully remove the dust cap, to source a new dust cap and to glue the new one in place.

Additionally, when removing the dust cap, there is a high likelihood that debris (paper from the cap, pieces of glue etc) ends up between the voice coil and the magnet. This means the shimming method is at least as likely to cause trouble as the battery method.

AdamS
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AdamS replied on Mon, Sep 10 2012 11:16 AM

Personally I agree with Soren and would NEVER re-foam a speaker without shimming it.

You'll get away with it more easily on the likes of a CX50/100 driver because of the driver's short travel but try it on the likes of a the 10" sub driver from a pair of MS150s, for example, and it is highly likely to go wrong due to this driver's long travel and very (very!) small magentic gap.

As ot the extra time involved in "removing, sourcing and fitting a dust cap" it takes barely 5 minutes more to remove and re-fit the dust cap. As to sourcing it, surely you order it at the same time as the foam surrounds?!

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