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MQA and bang&olufsen

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paolomariano
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paolomariano posted on Sat, Jan 7 2017 10:17 AM
Tidal has just started offering MQA streaming. I have a question. If I stream music in mqa format from my notebook and then stream it to the Apple TV (via airplay) which is connected to my bv10 and bl12-3, will I take advantage of the mqa format? Unsure

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Millemissen
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It is still not the same.

If MQA could be decoded to it's full potential, Meridian would not be able to license their technology to hardware companies like Bluesound or sell their own Explorer USB-DAC:

https://www.meridian-audio.com/products/computer-audio/explorer2/

 

From the MQA website

http://www.mqa.co.uk/customer/our-partners/audirvana-partner-page

Audirvana Plus 3 (available end of January 2017) integrates the MQA Core Decoder, enabling to get the full MQA quality with MQA devices, including the renderer only ones. Users who don’t have a MQA capable device will also benefit from the 2x sample rate of MQA streams thanks to the decoder in Audirvana Plus 3 that performs the unfolding.

Seems that the softwarebased solutions only do the job partially.

 

Maybe paulomariano will pull the tricker - and tell us, what he thinks.

 

MM

There is a tv - and there is a BV.

Barry Santini
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Millemissen:

Still - if it wasn't captured in the first place, it won't be there, when delievered to the listener.

MM

There is a tv - and there is a BV.

But one of the tenants of MqA is that the steep-pass filters typically used in digital recording can/will introduce subtle but audible signal timing issues that MQA processing...even if not decided can shift/reduce to allow these timing issues to be less impactful on the "air" of the sound.

B
Jeff
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Jeff replied on Sun, Jan 8 2017 2:23 AM

Barry Santini:
Millemissen:

 

Still - if it wasn't captured in the first place, it won't be there, when delievered to the listener.

 

MM

 

There is a tv - and there is a BV.

 

 

 

But one of the tenants of MqA is that the steep-pass filters typically used in digital recording can/will introduce subtle but audible signal timing issues that MQA processing...even if not decided can shift/reduce to allow these timing issues to be less impactful on the "air" of the sound.

 

 

B

I think this claim has as much validity as the claims of the high end wire manufacturers, its marketese. 

Jeff

I'm afraid I'm recovering from the BeoVirus. Sad

paolomariano
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Thank you to everybody for your interest in my question.

The bluesound solution sounds quite interesting to me, but I think that at the moment I would not be able to stream mqa music from Tidal using the bluesound device. Apparently, at the moment the only way is using a desktop pc and connecting it to my system with a cable, which is not really what I want to do.

I think I will go for the bluesound solution, when Tidal will allow it to stream mqa music directly from the device. In that case I would be able to use the bluesound app, and operate the bluesound device from my iPhone sitting on my sofa. This is what I aim at. I don't want to have notebook and a cable to the TV set... I like all this stuff to be hidden from my view...

Quality is important but my other two priorities are design and usability. I always need a combination of the three elements in the solution I choose.

Thank you again for the precious information provided!! Smile

Millemissen
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paolomariano:

Quality is important but my other two priorities are design and usability. I always need a combination of the three elements in the solution I choose.

If you (still) want to dig deeper into this, this article from Archimago (as always) might be helpfull:

http://archimago.blogspot.de/2017/01/comparison-tidal-mqa-music-high.html

MM

 

There is a tv - and there is a BV.

paolomariano
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Millemissen:

If you (still) want to dig deeper into this, this article from Archimago (as always) might be helpfull:

http://archimago.blogspot.de/2017/01/comparison-tidal-mqa-music-high.html

MM

There is a tv - and there is a BV.

Thank you!!!! Smile
Ditlev
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Ditlev replied on Sun, Nov 4 2018 11:53 PM

- double post - apologies!

 

Ditlev
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Ditlev replied on Sun, Nov 4 2018 11:53 PM

Millemissen:

 

You can use any software or hardware, that is MQA-enabled (they have to pay licenses to Meridian for that).

Bluesound supports MQA-decoding directly.

You should be able to use the Tidal app of the device - according to their website (and Tidal).

No need for your computer to run.

Connect the analog outputs of the Bluesound device to an analog input on your BV10.

Once you have configured the input on the tv/assigned it to a button on the remote AND you have started the playback from the Bluesound (Node2)/Tidal Highres, you will be able to hear the sound.

It probably won't work using the digital-outs (?).

 

MQA is a technology/a software that makes it possible to reduce the data, when digital higres files must be streamed over the internet.

It is - as such - pretty clever, but don't forget, that it can not make the sound better. What initially was in the files, is all that you get from them at home.

 

Tidal and the record companies claim, that they have access to (over) 30.000 highres files.

However, most of these files are upconverted from earlier versions - it would take years to find the original files/the analog tapes and master these again

Even if a recording is made in 24/96 (mostly 24/48 is used) a lot of these 'bits' are used during the mixing/the processing of the files, before the actual product for mastering is ready. Often more bits again are 'lost' during the final mastering for the delivery.

Recording in 24 bits is actually necsessary for having enough bits to process the files afterwards.

Most convenient audio products ends up with 8 or 10 bits, before they are converted to e.g. CD-quality (16/44.1), which in 99.999999% of the actual listening situations does not matter - the S/N ratio is low enough. Having the actual 16 bits of the CD would be more than fine - for the human hearing.....and for our playback gear.

The 96 or 192 kHz also helps a lot, beause it is much easier to handle the digital to analog convertion this way - it makes filtering much easier/preciser, when processing for mastering.

Do also remember, that human beings aren't capable of hearing anything above approx 22kHz - mostly (especially when you aren't young anymore) your hearing stops at a much lower level.

 

Often old master tapes (analog tapes) are used for these socalled highres files.

The problem however, is that they rarely are 1. generation master tapes - often even 3rd gen.

Each time you/they copy an analog tape, the sound quality decreases. Not seldom - in the earlier days - the initial tapes were overdubbed several times, they copied tracks from another tape onto them.

Usually the S/N ratio of these tapes (if they are good and played back on a good tape machine) is similar to a 10-12 bit digital recording.

During copying and the playback of the tapes a lot of the high frequenzies are lost.

You can not get anything near a genuine 24/96 digital recording from old master tapes.

Apart from all this - only very few loudspeakers would be capable of reproducing these higher frequenzies (if they were there).

 

Of course the record companies/right holders want to sell their products (once again). They have tried to sell us (the socalled) highres files as download for many years now - which did not really succeed on a wider scale.

A technology - like MQA - for streaming,  that makes it possible to shrink and stream these big  'highres' files using lower bandwith, is of course very welcome in the headquarters of the record companies.

 

If you consider, that you for the most part are paying for empty bits, you should consider, whether you are the one to fill the moneybags of the record company shareholders.

And the gear-makers are highly excited - time for selling us new hardware ;-)

For Tidal this certainly is a way to stand out against the competition - it is up to you, whether you want to pay the (over)price, they certainly will demand after a while or not.

 

On a sidenote:

Meridian speaks of 'master or studio quality' - these guys are clever!

They know that 'master/studio quality' does not have to be equal 24/96(192).

All they promise is, that their technology can transport, what is put into the stream, at a lower bandwith, than if it was not MQA-encoded.

 

MM

thanks for your post - helpful. Would bluesound+BL90 be able to stream MQA?

 

 

Millemissen
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Ditlev:

Would bluesound+BL90 be able to stream MQA?

The BL90’s accect source material in (L)PCM format and as analog.

You would have to have the Bluesound decoding the MQA stream first.

As for the 90’s see this theead also - especially page 4:

https://forum.beoworld.org/forums/t/35236.aspx?PageIndex=1

MM

There is a tv - and there is a BV.

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