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How to transfer Music/LP's from my 5500 system to Computer to create CD's

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David
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David posted on Sun, Aug 12 2012 9:46 AM

Hi folks. I am sure this problem has been raised before but I cannot remember the 'Answer'.

I need some advice on how to link-up my 5500 system to my Computer possibly using the Audacity software to create CD's from my collection of LP's etc.

I seem to recall the need for some accessory like coloured plugs into a DIN plug, but cannot recall the correct way of doing things.

If someone could HELP me thru this jungle of info it would be much appreciated.

I am led to believe that 'Audacity' is the best software for the purpose.

Regards from Guildford

David

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Peter
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Peter replied on Sun, Aug 12 2012 11:05 AM

The 5500 system makes it easy - use the RCA out from Tape 2 - I use a twin RCA to mini jack which goes into my computer. I personally use Toast as I have a Mac but Audacity is a good program. When playing music on your 5500, it will go through to the computer and you simply turn on the software and you are away!

Peter

Puncher
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I suppose it's worth having a go at least once! Your recording will only be as good as your PC soundcard, most are OK these days but normally external is better. Then you need to set your recording level - it's less critical if you record with 24bit resolution, more so if you record at 16 bit to ensure you lose as little resolution as possible .... you may have a few false starts. Once recorded you then need to split up the resulting file into individual tracks or at least add track markers - some software can do some of this automatically but it cannot handle live albums of classical ect. without silence between tracks. Finally you can name the individual tracks if you wish, adding as much metadata as you can be bothered which will help when navigating your music at a later date.

I would recommend recording at 24 bit resolution, with an rms recording level of approx. -15db (making sure there is no clipping). If you intend processing the digital files to try and reduce noise, pops or clicks etc. then do it in it's 24 bit form before reducing/dithering down to 16 bit.

This all takes time - after a few goes the normal response is "stuff that for a game of soldiers" and to buy the required music as either CD, FLAC or mp3............... life's far, far too short!!Big Smile

Ban boring signatures!

solderon29
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I have a little gadget that connects to the Tape 2 output,as Peter suggests,but it incorporates a converter to convert analogue to digital,and then connects via usb to the computer.I can copy from cd,radio,tape or vinyl onto the hard drive of the computer,then of course burn the compilation to cdr.These even then play back OK via my trusty Beocentre 9000!

There is no software to mess with,and the sound is good(IMHO)

Whats not to like?

It's a W-audio,usb 2008,and I think it was about £25!!!

Nick

David
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David replied on Sun, Aug 12 2012 7:39 PM

Peter.

Many thanks for this advice. A further point to consider is will I loose quality in the transfer if the distance of my RCA cable, which needs to be some 15 metres long.

Regards David

David
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David replied on Sun, Aug 12 2012 7:41 PM

Nick.

Many thanks, whereabouts can I obtain this item and will the distance between my 5500 and computer of approx 15 metres be a problem.

Regards

David

RaMaBo
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RaMaBo replied on Mon, Aug 13 2012 9:14 AM

Hi David,

 

i don't know where you can obtain this external USB soundcard mentioned before, but there are a few out there. The problem will be the distance! An USB connection may not be longer than 5m ! But you can put an active (!) USB hub in between 2 USB cables of 5m length each. this gives you a missing 5m for the RCA-DIN cable thingie, which might be ok. But you need a wall outlet for the active USB Hub in 5m distance from your computer.

 

Computer<--------------------->Active USB Hub<------------------------->USB Soundcard<------------------------------->Your Beomaster

                           Π                                                               Π                                                                                 Î

                        5m         Wall Outlet for USB               5m                                                                      5 m RCA Cable

                                               power supply

 

I hope that helps a bit :)

 

Regards

Ralph-Marcus

 

 

Ralph-Marcus

solderon29
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Is it a silly question,but how will you operate everything if the equipment is so far apart?

I just take the laptop to the Beosystem,but I guess you are using a pc in another room?

Extending audio is probably less troublesome than usb,so use a good quality screened cable.

Alternatively,you could add a B&O link to the system,and listen to and operate the equipment in your computer room.The MCL 2av even has an output port that could connect to the W-audio usb 2008!

I bought my converter from www.htfr.com,but they are probably widely available if you run a search ?

Nick

Peter
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Peter replied on Mon, Aug 13 2012 3:34 PM

This line sounds somehow familiar

I agree with Nick!

(British political joke for those not in the know!)

Peter

Søren Mexico
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Simplest way to grab vinyl is:

Connect your TT through a preamp or your BM directly to your computer, use a software like this You will have to manually insert Tittles, artist names and track tittles.

Its a heck of a job, I agree with Mika life is too shortLaughing

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

Puncher
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Søren Mexico:
............I agree with Mika...............

Ahem!!

Anyhoo, as I said, every one should try it once!

Ripping a CD collection is a mind numbing and thankless task, ripping, topping & tailing and naming a significant vinyl collection would require a direct descendant of Job!!

If you do manage to get through your whole collection you will almost certainly be unlikely/unwilling to tackle it again, in which case try and ensure you make the best job of doing this run through.

 

Ban boring signatures!

tournedos
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Puncher:

Søren Mexico:
............I agree with Mika...............

Ahem!!

Anyhoo, as I said, every one should try it once!

Laughing Anyway, I wholeheartedly agree, and I've never even gotten around of trying it in practice! Ripping might just be doable, but splitting into tracks, adding all the meta data by hand... meh.

I have actually rebought some of my more valuable vinyls as CDs whenever I spot them at a flea market, or something.

--mika

Puncher
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tournedos:
.........................rebought some of my more valuable vinyls as CDs..........................

There's a famous puppet, who's name I forget, with the catchphrase, "That's the way to do it"!!!

Of course, if you're really picky, you can investigate which CD pressing is best (i.e. avoid over compression etc.) before commiting to your lossless library for posterity.

 I would estimate ripping and naming a CD (using an online naming and artwork sevice) at ~ 10 mins. For a vinyl album (topped, tailed, named, with artwork) I would estimate at well over an hour (after a bit of practise), whilst a decent CD pressing is almost certainly going to be a better quality rip than your home recorded vinyl version.

Ban boring signatures!

Søren Mexico
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Puncher:
 I would estimate ripping and naming a CD (using an online naming and artwork sevice) at ~ 10 mins. For a vinyl album (topped, tailed, named, with artwork) I would estimate at well over an hour (after a bit of practise), whilst a decent CD pressing is almost certainly going to be a better quality rip than your home recorded vinyl version.

Thats a good estimate, but if you use Itunes, Think about that you will have to change computer in the future, I have tried copying Itunes files to a new computer a couple of times, I never got a perfect transfer to new computer, there was always missing files, missing songs, missing artwork, last time I did it I got tired of it, and got my CDs out of storage, uninstalled all itunes files, downloaded a new fresh itunes and copied it all into itunes again. But this time I didn't pack away the CDs, but kept them ready to play, ugly but better, I listen more to my CDs and vinyl, and use only Itunes for party or sometimes background music. Here a couple of photos, some 300 plus CDs, 100 plus LPs, and some 500, 45s not shown, the 45s (mostly for my Jukebox) I record to cassettes.

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

Calvin
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Calvin replied on Mon, Aug 13 2012 10:41 PM

A thankless task? Pah!  I found it incredibly satisfying after I was done and had everything tagged nicely.

If you're recording a lot, I would definitely recommend getting a specialist piece of software.  Yes you can do it for free using Audacity or the like but other programs will mostly automate all the editing, cutting and applying correct tag fields.  I've got Spin It Again which I think was £15 or something when I got it which probably saved me countless hours/days of my life.

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