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BeoLab 3

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andyrowsell
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andyrowsell posted on Fri, Jul 6 2012 5:38 PM

hi i a thinking of  buying some beolab 3 speakers and was wondering if anyone could tell me whether they are compatible with a computer.

I would be grateful for any help with my query.

 

Thanks  andy

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mbee
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mbee replied on Fri, Jul 6 2012 5:57 PM

Compatible with a computer : yes, like every Beolab, but without a cinch (RCA) plug : you have to buy (make) a jack>>DIN cable.

BUT : in line mode, the Beolabs will turn off when they are not fed with a signal for more than 2 minutes (I think I'm correct for the 2 minutes, but it can be something else, but close). So you will miss some rare "event" sounds coming from your computer after phases of silence, or ear only the end of the sound after the Beolab wake up.

BUT 2 : with some computer (like Macs), the audio out is deactivated after some times of silence, or in sleep mode, then there is static noise on the connector, wich means no silence on beolabs, no sleep mode for the beolabs, just continuous (white) noise.

BillC
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BillC replied on Sun, Jul 8 2012 1:01 AM

Hi,

As mbee said, the BeoLab 3's are compatible with PCs. I have my BeoLab 3s hooked up to my HTPC via Powerlink to jack cables. You can source those from your B&O dealer or http://www.soundsheavenly.co.uk . Just make sure to specify its for the BeoLab 3 

In my case, I don't get any white noise as the BeoLab 3s are hooked up to my pc soundcard. With such a high quality speakers I would suggest you use some sort of discrete soundcard or DAC - sound from motherboard audio aren't usually great (but thats my experience)

Having the BeoLab 3s for your PC is something you wouldn't regret, I love them (only thing that would tempt me is the BeoLab 5)

 

 

jk1002
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You will actually find that many computers have crappy line out sound quality.

This is where the playmaker fits in that should come out soon.

 

If you use iPhone/Itunes and can use Airplay that might be interesting for you.

 

The Beolab 3s are a blast, I have them for a few years now with a beolab 2 and they still amaze me, in fact I might buy a 2nd pair.

 

JK

elephant
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Andy, welcome to Beoworld and hopefully the world of BANG&OLUFSEN and B&O.

I used the BeoLab 3s attached to my IBM laptop when on assignment overseas - I was not going to lug a whole system, so I simply bought speakers at the destination and then lugged them back to add to my collection Big Smile

I did the same with BeoLab 4s that are marketed as PC compatible speakers (they even have a specific switch to input level differences) again attached to IBM and HP laptops.  And later to a Macbook.

However the Lab 4s are not a patch on the BeoLab 3s, so do not hesitate -- take the plunge. 

BillC:
In my case, I don't get any white noise as the BeoLab 3s are hooked up to my pc soundcard. With such a high quality speakers I would suggest you use some sort of discrete soundcard or DAC - sound from motherboard audio aren't usually great (but thats my experience)

While I have never used an external DAC I did use the BeoPort which acts as a control interface between the speakers and the PC.  Here (as recently discussed in another thread) I did encounter a cable issue between the BeoPort speakers and the BeoPort which was a hiss but easily solved by either having the right (more modern) aged BeoPort or adjusting the earth wire inside the Powerlink cable.

I mention the BeoPort in conjunction with the DAC for several reasons, one being I never experienced the on/off *pop*/loss concern you originally expressed - I suspect the BeoPort insulated me from that.

But the other reason is to asl you to think ahead to the next B&O purchase, because if this is your first there is a strong chance you will catch the Beovirus .... and it will only be the first of many Smile

So the BeoPort positions you for:

  • controlling the PC source via the B&O remote - the famous Beo4
  • seamlessly adding other sources in the future
  • establishing a media centre capability via a B&O TV
  • adding distributed speakers in other rooms

However the BeoPort starts you down the path of investing in the MasterLink technologies, so perhaps a DAC connected via a wireless node may be a better route that is more "future proof" -- see the many threads on the Cambridge DAC (and other brands, but Cambridge is easier to search for) and the use of (for example only!!) Apple's Airport Express and Airport Extreme/Time Capsule

BeoNut since '75

Michael
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elephant:

Andy, welcome to Beoworld and hopefully the world of BANG&OLUFSEN and B&O.

I used the BeoLab 3s attached to my IBM laptop when on assignment overseas - I was not going to lug a whole system, so I simply bought speakers at the destination and then lugged them back to add to my collection

I did the same with BeoLab 4s that are marketed as PC compatible speakers (they even have a specific switch to input level differences) again attached to IBM and HP laptops. And later to a Macbook.

However the Lab 4s are not a patch on the BeoLab 3s, so do not hesitate -- take the plunge.

While I have never used an external DAC I did use the BeoPort which acts as a control interface between the speakers and the PC. Here (as recently discussed in another thread) I did encounter a cable issue between the BeoPort speakers and the BeoPort which was a hiss but easily solved by either having the right (more modern) aged BeoPort or adjusting the earth wire inside the Powerlink cable.

I mention the BeoPort in conjunction with the DAC for several reasons, one being I never experienced the on/off *pop*/loss concern you originally expressed - I suspect the BeoPort insulated me from that.

But the other reason is to asl you to think ahead to the next B&O purchase, because if this is your first there is a strong chance you will catch the Beovirus .... and it will only be the first of many

So the BeoPort positions you for:

controlling the PC source via the B&O remote - the famous Beo4 seamlessly adding other sources in the future establishing a media centre capability via a B&O TV adding distributed speakers in other rooms

However the BeoPort starts you down the path of investing in the MasterLink technologies, so perhaps a DAC connected via a wireless node may be a better route that is more "future proof" -- see the many threads on the Cambridge DAC (and other brands, but Cambridge is easier to search for) and the use of (for example only!!) Apple's Airport Express and Airport Extreme/Time Capsule

current forum = http://forum.beoworld.org/search/SearchResults.aspx?q=cambridge&o=Relevance forum archive = http://archivedforum.beoworld.org/search/SearchResults.aspx?q=cambridge

Beo-Ed :-)

Yes welcome to beoworld! I would suggest a USB sound card of good quality so that you can use your speakers without the hissing noise that might be apparent in the background or after some time without sound on a Mac (or pc's that also saves power).

Beolab 50, Beolab 8000 x 2, Beolab 4000 x 2, 
BeoSound Core, BeoSound 9000, BeoSound Century, 
BeoLit 15, BeoPlay A1, BeoPlay P2, BeoPlay H9 3rd Gen, BeoPlay H6, EarSet 3i, 
BeoVision Eclipse Gen 2 55", BeoPlay V1-40, 
BeoCom 6000 and so much else :)  

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