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Beovox S75 Rescue

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RunieNL
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RunieNL posted on Thu, Dec 10 2015 4:11 PM

Hi everyone,

I recently bought a pair of beovox S75 speakers to replace my current speakers. They were in awfull shape though... Sad
A previous owner painted them white(!) and the guy who I bought them from did a small try to remove the paint with a heat gun. It seemed to work OK for the veneer, but It seems that the back of the speakers started to melt a bit.

I've been busy with them to this point, removing all the paint. I used a chemical stripper that (free translated) said to be hard on paint but soft for wood. That sounded like something I could use!!

Altough most of the paint came off quite easy, There is still some paint left in the deeper woodgrains. Does anyone have a good idea on how to remove this safely?

I've read about Rich his superb job on rescueing some M70 speakers
(http://archivedforum.beoworld.org/forums/t/35494.aspx)
where it shows that thorough sanding can lead to sanding all the veneer away. Ofcourse I don't want that...

Any good ideas?

René

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remdk
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remdk replied on Sat, Dec 12 2015 11:50 AM

In Danish it is called " linolie" which comes from the hoerseed or linseed.

Best regards

René.

Oh sorry, I didn´t see there was one more page, my answer is about the oil. :-

Edit by remdk

riverstyx
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RunieNL:
some more cleaning with acetone and different kinds of material (I was using the steel wool, but after reading Martins post, maybe thats not a good idea...)

Despite what I said, I wouldn't worry too much in this instance, It's much more of an issue when the finished product is likely to be exposed to moisture.

RunieNL:
I have two brass brushes, One quite soft, the other a bit harder. Ofcourse the harder brush cleans better and deeper and it can take paint out, but it takes a lot of wood away too and makes the grain very deep and open, so I'm very carefull using that one.

Yeah, I guess a wire brush is likely to be much more effective at removing the paint from within the grain than wire wool, but also a lot more abrasive to the surface of the wood. If using a brush I would stick to doing so whilst the wood is dry.

RunieNL:
Any ideas about other names for "old english" and "danish oil"? I've been to one store sofar and couldn't find any...

Danish oil is the usual name It's a mixture of linseed along with a little varnish. From what I can see it does seem to be called Danish oil (or deense olie) in .nl so perhaps just try another store.

Kind Regards,

Martin.

 

sonavor
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Here and here is the Old English Oil that Søren is referring to.

-sonavor

RunieNL
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Hmmm, still can't find either danish oil or old english... I had to stop searching to put my two year old daughter to bed...

I therefore started with the backsides. Just some sanding to prepare it for spraypainting. But I noticed a difference between the two speakers.
On one speaker the screwholes for the stands are in the same plane as the backside:

On the other speaker they stick a bit out:

What is the correct situation, and what can be done to correct it?

Søren Mexico
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If you dont find Danish oil go for boiled linseed oil, and if you cant get Old English over there, find a dark oil based wood stain, it has to be oil based to go with the linseed oil

As for the screw bushings, check the inside of the speaker they are normally pressed in from the inside, if it is loose press it back in, if not put a wood block on it and carefully try to bang it back in with a hammer, in both cases epoxy it from the inside when finished

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

RunieNL
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Ok, the bushings couldn't be pressed in, but were easily hammered in. I will fixate them later, when I start with the inside.
I still haven't found an oil-based wood stain. Most of them are water-based or wax... I'll keep searching for them or order them online if I have too.

Off topic:
The S75's are my first B&O purchase. I'm looking for a receiver that matches these S75's both in looks and sound. There's a Beomaster 3000-2 for sale somewhat nearby, and I really like the looks of it. In the add it is said (offcourse) that it's in good shape. What can I expect of such a machine?
I really like the clarity in the sound of the receiver I'm using now (an all digital american mastodon, good in performance but no looks at all), can I expect the same of the BM3000-2 or do I need to put lots of work in it like Søren Mexico is doing now with his Beolab 5000? I'm not affraid of re-capping the cross-over in my S75's, but working on an amplifier is scaring me... And what about connecting my CD-player, is that even possible?

René

Søren Mexico
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BM 3000-2: You will have to repair all amps/receivers of this age and type, I have BM 901, BM 2400, BM 1000, BM 4000, BM 4400 (was worse than the BL 5000) All of these needed at least new electrolytic caps and lamps most of them also some  trimmers, non of them came in good working condition, all was bought unseen and unheard on Ebay or in DK. Only amp/receiver I ever bought that worked out of the box was a BM 5000 pizzabox (still going strong), so if you dont want to start repairing go for BMs 5000,5500,6500 in good working condition.. Nearly all BMs can be used with a CD player (AUX or TAPE input)  

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

RunieNL
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Søren Mexico:

BM 3000-2: You will have to repair all amps/receivers of this age and type, I have BM 901, BM 2400, BM 1000, BM 4000, BM 4400 (was worse than the BL 5000) All of these needed at least new electrolytic caps and lamps most of them also some  trimmers, non of them came in good working condition, all was bought unseen and unheard on Ebay or in DK. Only amp/receiver I ever bought that worked out of the box was a BM 5000 pizzabox (still going strong), so if you dont want to start repairing go for BMs 5000,5500,6500 in good working condition.. Nearly all BMs can be used with a CD player (AUX or TAPE input)  

It's the woodcase amps I like. I'm not very fond of the looks of those pizza-boxes... Can you, or anyone, suggest me your favorite woodcase receiver that would fit these S75's? Could the BM 3000-2 be on that list?
So for repairing them, in most cases it's placing new capacitors and lamps (what is a trimmer?)? No measuring devices are needed? I have no experience or knowledge of electrical engineering, so doing just simple restaurations might be reachable, if it will get more difficult I will get lost...

RunieNL
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I'm looking forward starting on the veneer with oil to cover up those paint spots, but that will have to wait untill I find the correct ones... I've found a product based on tung oil instead of linseedoil. Could this be a good replacement for the danish oil? Most colouring oils are for wooden floors and come in very large containers, they seem a bit big for my two speakers...

Untill then, I can't do very much, so I tried to fix the veneer. A piece got pulled off with removing that glued-on cloth on the underside of the speaker, remember? I was able to recover the largest splinter to fill the hole.

I soaked it in Acetone first to get all the remaining glue off, then used some woodglue to glue it back in place. When dry, it needed some sanding, but after that, It looked OK. There are still some deep grooves left though. Do I need to fill them up? with what?
I can't show pictures yet of the current situation, because the speakers are completely wrapped in plastic for spraypainting the back.


After my chemical paint remover and the heat gun of the pre-owner, the back was in very bad condition. I sanded them with paper 120 and now they are drying in the garage after a spraypaint in black.

sonavor
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sonavor replied on Mon, Dec 14 2015 12:49 AM

From that era of B&O receivers I would have to say the Beomaster 4400 is my favorite. I also have the Beomaster 4000. Both are nice but I like the slanted panel of the BM4400 and it has a lot of power.

RunieNL
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I finally found Danish oil! Based on tung oil though, not linseed oil. However, still no luck with an oil based wood stain. I will have to order the "old english" online and wait for the delivery... Let's hope that the package from Martin/Dillen will arrive soon to keep me busy 😉 

Søren Mexico
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RunieNL:

I finally found Danish oil! Based on tung oil though, not linseed oil. However, still no luck with an oil based wood stain. I will have to order the "old english" online and wait for the delivery... Let's hope that the package from Martin/Dillen will arrive soon to keep me busy 😉 

I found this about Tung oil. Tung oil based Danish oil may have some driers in it, but read the user manual

Boiled linseed oil has driers added to make it dry much faster than raw linseed oil, which can take weeks or months to dry. The drying is adequate only when the excess is wiped off after each application. Tung oil doesn’t contain driers. It takes two or three days to dry adequately in a warm room when all the excess is wiped off.

It usually takes four or five coats of tung oil, sanded after each, to get a nice even satin sheen. The surface will be rough and spotty until this point. That’s why you have to sand.

Sanding is unnecessary with boiled linseed oil, except after the first coat. Then one or two more coats with a day between each will produce an even satin sheen.

The same number of coats of tung oil will be more water resistant than boiled linseed oil. In fact, boiled linseed oil won’t be water resistant at all. The surface will dull after short contact with water.

 

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

RunieNL
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RunieNL replied on Wed, Dec 16 2015 11:42 AM

I can see that he oil contains white spirit and methanol, are those the driers they are talking about? I could choose between a "normal" danish oil, and from a different brand "improved" danish oil. Both based on tung oil. The difference was that the "improved" danish oil contains more oil and less additives (driers?). I chose the "normal" danish oil. From what I can read I may accidentaly have made the right choice...

This is the product I bought: http://www.rustins.eu/Details.asp?ProductID=743

 

RunieNL
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RunieNL replied on Wed, Dec 16 2015 11:46 AM

Do you think it still needs sanding after oiling? Won't I sand off the old english covering up the paint? (at least I hope it will cover up the paint...)

Søren Mexico
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RunieNL:

Do you think it still needs sanding after oiling? Won't I sand off the old english covering up the paint? (at least I hope it will cover up the paint...)

After the treatment with Old English I apply the oil and let dry for 24 hours, I then sand light with 200-240 grain and apply oil a second time, let it dry again and polish it with a lint free rag. Old English is very thin and will penetrate into the wood/paint. I had to apply Old English some 5 times before I got it to my liking. I have never tried Danish oil, only Boiled linseed oil

 

Collecting Vintage B&O is not a hobby, its a lifestyle.

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