Sign in   |  Join   |  Help

Beogram 8000 on the way...

rated by 0 users
Not Answered This post has 0 verified answers | 77 Replies | 2 Followers

etype76
Top 500 Contributor
Tokyo, Japan
74 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
etype76 posted on Mon, Aug 24 2015 5:05 PM

Hello all, I'm new here and live in Japan,

 

My current turntable is a Thorens TD160 with a Rega arm which I restored and it looks great to say it was a spontaneous Ebay purchase. Now I've made another such purchase, a Beogram 8000. I have read enough to realise that these machines need plenty of TLC after 30+ years. 

My first question is basically, What is the first order of business when the turntable arrives? I understand that it is working and in "excellent condition" with a MMC20CL cartridge with the original protector. 

Beyond that, I don't know much else...

Any initial pointers appreciated. 

 

Thanks

All Replies

sonavor
Top 50 Contributor
Texas, United States
3,156 Posts
OFFLINE
Gold Member

etype76:

Also, I now realize that the tonearm assembly came up  too easily because the rear right plastic 'hook' was also partly broken. so now the tonearm is held firmly onto the rails with just one intact hook, the rear left one. Has anybody ever repaired a piece of broken plastic on the tonearm? I was thinking a thin small piece of plastic tubing glued into the recess of the plastic 'C' and feed the rail through it might work.

Thanks

Can you post some pictures of the broken part?

 

etype76
Top 500 Contributor
Tokyo, Japan
74 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Here is the broken plastic piece from the front rail guide, I tried to glue it back without much luck. The other broken piece I suspect happened some time ago and not through shipping as I haven't found and broken pieces in the chassis. The tonearm sits on the rail quite comfortably but I just worried that it will be too susceptible to vibration or being disturbed. 

 

 


Lee
Top 150 Contributor
Newcastle upon Tyne UK
699 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Lee replied on Wed, Sep 23 2015 12:28 AM

Try a product called gorilla glue. Its amazing!

etype76
Top 500 Contributor
Tokyo, Japan
74 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

and the broken "C" rail guide


etype76
Top 500 Contributor
Tokyo, Japan
74 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

And the rear right rail guide, you can see the broken bit angled slightly against the rail

 

(sorry if my images are upside down, I don't know what's causing that in my Safari.) 


Lee
Top 150 Contributor
Newcastle upon Tyne UK
699 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Lee replied on Wed, Sep 23 2015 1:03 AM

Seriously gorilla glue will stick and hold that. I tried all kinds of glue on that plastic and none would work... except gorilla glue.

etype76
Top 500 Contributor
Tokyo, Japan
74 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Thanks Lee, I'll look out for it. did you have a technique for glueing it back? I mean, with the arm assembly in position or pointing upwards? 

Lee
Top 150 Contributor
Newcastle upon Tyne UK
699 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Lee replied on Wed, Sep 23 2015 10:30 AM
I had to glue a different part but it was made out of the same plastic. If it was me I'd remove the arm carriage and glue it then fit it back once the glue has had time to go off.
Dave Farr
Top 50 Contributor
France
2,265 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
There are different types of Gorilla glue. One type you have to dampen surfaces and it foams and expands so do not use that one. It is a very strong glue - used in boat building. A good 2 part epoxy such as Araldite is also one of the best for this type of plastic.

Dave.
Lee
Top 150 Contributor
Newcastle upon Tyne UK
699 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member
Lee replied on Wed, Sep 23 2015 2:06 PM
The one I used to good effect was the superglue version. I tried a product called plastic weld (a type of epoxy that you have to mix) but that didn't work.
tamtapir
Top 150 Contributor
Örebro, Sweden
504 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

etype76:

And the rear right rail guide, you can see the broken bit angled slightly against the rail

 

(sorry if my images are upside down, I don't know what's causing that in my Safari.) 

In front of me I have a leftover baseboard from a Beogram 6002. I have no idea if any parts from it fits within a Beogram 8000 but if you or anyone else can confirm that this is the case - and if I still have the right parts - I would like to donate them to you.

 

/***

 

etype76
Top 500 Contributor
Tokyo, Japan
74 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Thank you for your kind offer! I know the 6002 looks similar but that baseplate seems to be quite different, I don't think I could make use of any of those parts. What happened to that poor machine? ;)

tamtapir
Top 150 Contributor
Örebro, Sweden
504 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

etype76:

Thank you for your kind offer! I know the 6002 looks similar but that baseplate seems to be quite different, I don't think I could make use of any of those parts. What happened to that poor machine? ;)

I think the same as you, not much is in common between 8000 and 6002 but I wasn't sure.

This turntable lived its life, along with another similar, in a record shop in a small town in central Sweden. I came across both for a lot of years ago and made one of two. Since then, a lot of parts were left. Some have been spent over the years and now remains only a few pieces.

/***

 

etype76
Top 500 Contributor
Tokyo, Japan
74 Posts
OFFLINE
Bronze Member

Stepping back, I could ask myself what it is I really want from this machine; basically, a fully functioning 8000 that looks stunning. My work on it has got it closer but I can see now I am likely to damage it if I keep opening it up (don't have space or workbench to leave it all out all the time.) and pressing on the PCB and other parts. So, today, I boxed it up (properly) and have sent it to someone who knows what they're doing B&O-wise to bring it up to scratch. 

there was a moment when I felt like buying a parts machine or one fully restored, but what a waste if I have this one already. At least I won't be taking yet another Beogram out of action. The restoration somewhat beat me, although not in the area I thought, I figured replacing the caps would be the challenge but it was actually the set up and broken tonearm plastic. Will keep you posted on its progress

thanks for all the great advice! 

sonavor
Top 50 Contributor
Texas, United States
3,156 Posts
OFFLINE
Gold Member

Good choice. The repairs on these turntables often look simple but they really do get involved. There is much more than just changing out capacitors. You have to be ready for all types of problems. Still, you learned a lot about the turntable and I am sure the person you sent the Beogram to for repair will restore it to "like new" condition. You won't be disappointed in the investment once you get it back.

Page 5 of 6 (78 items) « First ... < Previous 2 3 4 5 6 Next > | RSS
Beoworld Security Certificate

SSL