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BeoCenter 9000 voltage-switching detail?

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trackbeo
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trackbeo posted on Tue, Oct 10 2017 4:18 AM

So I just received a BeoCenter 9000 with switchable voltage wheel, a 2-pin 240V plug (so-called Europlug? or IEC Type C?), and want to change to 110V (USA).  I'm not so dumb that I can't set the wheel to 110, Buuuuuut... I'd rather not open up the chassis to answer one simple question (even though I'll probably have to open it later, to re-cap the CD controller):

Is one Euro-pin connected to chassis ground?  Or are both sides floating and merely connected to opposite sides of a transformer?  In the USA, one prong would be wider and the other narrower, indicating that it should be plugged in so the neutral, not the hot, would be -- if any were -- the side connected to the metal frame.

So before I blindly cut off the plug head (or buy one of those cheapie adapters that doesn't seem to care which pin is which) must I get an ohmmeter to see whether one of the Euro-pins is chassis ground, and maintain that orientation else risk a fault?

Thanks from a long-time lurker!

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joeyboygolf
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There is no earth connection, both the pins of the Euro plug are connected to the transformer.

Regards Graham

solderon29
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Most European electrical equipment is designed using the double insulation system,rather than utilising a "ground" for safety.

The power connector can be connected either way around.

Regulations here in the U.K. state that a dedicated adaptor should be employed to convert the 2 pin Euro plug to our 3 pin connector.There must be something similar available for your system too.Don't use a "shaver adaptor" as these use different size connectors,and it might be intermittent in use.

Nick

Guy
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Guy replied on Tue, Oct 10 2017 10:25 AM

To back Graham up, the 'insulation test' for the BC9000 that is listed in the repair manual requires you to check that neither of the power supply pins are connected to chassis earth.

I think that the USA household power distribution system sees what we would consider 'neutral' being connected to earth/ground where the power enters the house, so perhaps that's the source of your doubts. My BC9500 has a two pin (240V) plug fitted and works both ways around!

trackbeo
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Guy:
To back Graham up, the 'insulation test' for the BC9000 that is listed in the repair manual requires you to check that neither of the power supply pins are connected to chassis earth.

Now *that* is what I call definitive!  Thank you sir, and all!

Long term, I plan to cut the plug off and put on a new screw-terminal US plug head.  Sacrilege, I know, but somehow I just don't trust the adaptors, which are at heart nothing but stab-in connectors of unknown quality.  Although I suppose wall receptacles are nothing but stab-in connectors when you get right down to it, heh.  Looking for a UL label in the meantime...  Once again thanks.

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