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Beogram 8000 Project

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sonavor
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I have been wanting to work a Beogram 8000 restoration project for over two years now but kept getting derailed by other things. Now that I have several Beogram 8002 projects under my belt and a few Beogram 400x projects finished, it is time to get at least one Beogram 8000 turntable working in my home.

Two of my Beogram 8000 turntable candidates were from system purchases I made over the last two years. A third turntable is one I found for a good price on Ebay.

All three BG8000 turntables were acquired in non-working condition. I also collected some of the Beogram service and technical manuals so I think I am ready to start.


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sonavor
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I had to order a few 2200uF, 16V and 4.7uF, 100V capacitors as well as some 40 pin DIP sockets (to replace the old ones for the microprocessor). Everything else I had plenty of stock so I am ready to start working on the first Beogram.  I think I will restore the newest serial number turntable first as it has all of the factory integrated modifications.

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sonavor
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I think it is easier and safer to remove the main (floating) chassis to clean and work on the various components.


sonavor
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It is hard to seen in the pictures the film of grime on the turntable.  I removed a lot of the components so I could get to everywhere I needed to clean and lubricate.


sonavor
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This part shows recapped 0C1 and 0C2 after cleaning the floating chassis.


sonavor
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I removed the tonearm assembly from the rails and the drive shaft for cleaning and maintenance. There was a lot of grease build up in spots. On my Beogram 8002 project Martin pointed out that the bottom rail has a rubber insert that the rail ends fit into before going into the mounting sleeve. That is for some vibration damping on the USA voltage. This Beogram 8000 has those rubber pieces so I cleaned them and applied some rubber conditioner.


sonavor
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While the tonearm assembly is disassembled, here is a picture of the tonearm assembly underside.


sonavor
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The main chassis is now cleaned up, 0C1 and 0C2 recapped and the tonearm assembly lubricated and put back together.


sonavor
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Here is the front view. Later today I will get the main components connected and test if the recapped main board is working.


sonavor
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A couple more things to do before trying out the reworked board and chassis. I opened up the control panel keypad and it was pretty dirty.


sonavor
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Easy to wipe down and clean the inside. I also removed the buttons and cleaned the slots they fit in.


sonavor
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I learned from my Beogram 8002 restorations not to use isopropyl alcohol to clean the inside, black chassis. The alcohol melts the black paint. However, some drops spilled onto my Beogram 8000 chassis as I was cleaning the keypad. I will have to touch that up later.


sonavor
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Next thing is to install Martin's tach disc. Here is the disassembled inner platter ready for the new disc.


sonavor
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It is a little tricky getting the snap ring put back on but here is the re-installed tach disc.


sonavor
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Now it is re-installed in the Beogram and I am ready to see if the turntable functions. The small snap rings for the speed sensor assembly were actually harder to put back on that the large, tach disc snap ring.


sonavor
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I connected up the main board, transformer, keypad and gave the Beogram a try. At first the power did not appear to be on.  There was not red dot on the display. I measured the power supply voltages though and they were there. It turned out that the main board 800mA fuse was blown. That was before I got the turntable and this one should be good to go so I replaced the fuse with a new one and power was restored.

All of the control panel buttons work. The only problem I see is the Beogram downs start up correctly or stop correctly. In both cases, the arm moves close to where it should, then stops. I will have to look into that next but it is nice that the turntable has life.


sonavor
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I added the top platter and my speed test record to check the turntable speeds. They were pretty good. I saw a upper measurement of 33.6 RPM and a lower measurement of 31.5 RPM.  For 45 RPM I measures 44.9 to 45.3 RPM.


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