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Beogram 8000 Project

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sonavor
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I have been wanting to work a Beogram 8000 restoration project for over two years now but kept getting derailed by other things. Now that I have several Beogram 8002 projects under my belt and a few Beogram 400x projects finished, it is time to get at least one Beogram 8000 turntable working in my home.

Two of my Beogram 8000 turntable candidates were from system purchases I made over the last two years. A third turntable is one I found for a good price on Ebay.

All three BG8000 turntables were acquired in non-working condition. I also collected some of the Beogram service and technical manuals so I think I am ready to start.


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sonavor
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I had to order a few 2200uF, 16V and 4.7uF, 100V capacitors as well as some 40 pin DIP sockets (to replace the old ones for the microprocessor). Everything else I had plenty of stock so I am ready to start working on the first Beogram.  I think I will restore the newest serial number turntable first as it has all of the factory integrated modifications.

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sonavor
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Here is the other older board with the modifications to bring it up to later production models.


sonavor
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A closer look at the modified board shows that the Periodical Variation of Turntable Speed fix was added on versus the other Beogram 8000 where the change was more integrated into the microcomputer board (from the factory).


sonavor
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I had to order a few 2200uF, 16V and 4.7uF, 100V capacitors as well as some 40 pin DIP sockets (to replace the old ones for the microprocessor). Everything else I had plenty of stock so I am ready to start working on the first Beogram.  I think I will restore the newest serial number turntable first as it has all of the factory integrated modifications.

sonavor
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Here is what the motor control photo resistors, lamp and light control assembly looks like inside for controlling the forward and reverse.
The two big adjustment screws fit on either side of the lamp so their height blocks or allows light to pass to the photo resistors. I had always thought the adjustment screws were moving some internal part for the sensitivity adjustment but it is just the position of the screw that is doing the job.


sonavor
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The boards needing recapping were already removed so I unsoldered the existing electrolytic capacitors. To begin the recap, I started with the microprocessor module. It has one electrolytic capacitor (C28) that needs replacing - 47uF, 10V and I want to replace the old processor socket.


sonavor
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Here is the old and new processor socket


sonavor
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This is the processor module after the new parts are installed.
On some of my Beogram 8002 restorations I had to replace the 4.7nF capacitors for the display. They are small and difficult to get to because of space and they are soldered on both sides of the board.  I think I will leave these alone for now and see if the display works when I get the board ready for testing.


sonavor
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When I recapped the main board I kept the grounding ring for the large, 2200uF capacitor to use with my replacement. That makes it easier to attach.


sonavor
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Here is the recapped main board. I also replaced the 180 ohms (R104) resistor.
The next step is to resolder all of the connector joints. Those can cause problems and these Beogram 8000 main boards I have are all slightly curved.


sonavor
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I have now resoldered all of the main board connectors and switched out the two 1uF capacitors that were mounted on the trace side. There are now just a couple of capacitors to check on the chassis before I can reassemble the turn table for a check of the board reword. If that goes well I will be able to start in on checking the tangential arm assembly.


Jason
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Jason replied on Fri, Jul 10 2015 10:13 PM

I do enjoy your threads john 👍👍

It's a wonderful deck once restored and as perfect as i think they look, I wish sometimes the flat top of the lid was angled up to match the rest of the 8000 system

might be just me though😄

jason

sonavor
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Thanks Jason.  I think I will always prefer the look of the original 400x series but I have owned a Beogram 8002 since 1983 and really love the performance of that series. This Beogram 8000 should be the same except I can use the MMC 20CL and MMC 6000 cartridges in it.

This picture shows how badly curved the main board is with this Beogram. It is recapped and I am close to running some tests with it but I am wondering if there are any hidden surprises with this board.


sonavor
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I re-installed the processor in the new socket. It fits very snug.


sonavor
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It is time to move on to the main chassis. There is quite a bit of dust and grime so I will dissemble the tonearm assembly and recap OC1 and OC2.


sonavor
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Here is 0C1 and 0C2 before the recap.  This step is pretty much just like the Beogram 8002.


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